Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    81
    I am having my 15 year old Rheem unit replaced. TXV gone bad and coils very rusty. The Model number is RPGB036JAS.

    The old unit cooled and heated fine, except on the coldest of days when the heat strips would kick in (only a couple times throughout the entire winter).

    My installer said he is putting in a 3.5 ton unit.

    But isn't this model number for a 3.0 ton unit?

    Should I question him on this?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Zelienople, Pa
    Posts
    2,965
    Why are you upsizing?

    Was a load calc performed?
    How tall are you Private???!!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    81
    I asked him to replace the unit. I did not ask him to upsize. I told him I was happy with the performance of the old unit.

    My other concern is that the air handler is in a closet that the unit just fits into. The 3.5-ton air handler is going to be larger than the existing 3-ton I assume.

    I need to ask him why he is planning to upsize the unit.

    Any other questions I should ask him?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    81
    A load calc has not been performed. I am almost certain he does not do load calculations.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Zelienople, Pa
    Posts
    2,965
    Not to sound smart, but you've been registered here for almost 2 years.
    Have you read the site at all, and if so why are you ignoring the need for a load calc?
    How tall are you Private???!!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    81
    You are right, I should get a load calculation done.

    My hesitation is that the guy doing my work has done a good job before (nice guy, systems worked, heated and cooled fine, very reasonable electric bills, reasonable charge for service, etc).

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    340
    You're here, so you must not trust him TOO much!

    Tell him you want a load calculation done and then you'll decide on what size system to install. If he doesn't do load calculations then you can either do it yourself (see bullseye above) or hire a different contractor. Personally, I'd recommend you do both.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,513
    you said it was working properly and to your satifaction
    except cold days when the strip heaters kick in. no mater what size this will still happen on the cold days
    to upgrade to a bigger unit will be of any better value except brobably cause a lot of problems and higher bills
    with out a heat load done it is guess work and you are the one footing the bil either way. have a load done or stick with the same size with has worked fine for years
    if this guy cant do a load then he should not be selling units. plane and simple

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153
    Your old unit was 36,000 btus and a new 3 ton of any generic brand will be 33,000 btus. If he doesn't upsize he will be downsizing. The load calc will show 1.75 tons anyways and we all know that ain't right. Is your wife fat? Maybe he is taking that into consideration?
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

  10. #10
    Petec, if your 3 ton worked fine then a 3.5 will offer the same.
    I always oversize my systems by half a ton. Its worked for me, and I assure myself that the homeowner cannot complain of lack of cooling.
    Call him with your concern and ask him to do a load calc. like mentioned above. But if its a swap unit for unit then there shouldn't be a problem going up a half of a ton. You won't even see the difference is my bet.

  11. #11
    The model # you supplied indicates it was a 3 ton system.
    Has the installing contractor verified the heat loss/gain loads?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    12,914
    petec
    Member

    Registered: Jan 2004
    Posts: 47
    I had a terrible sweating problem on my crawlspace ducts this summer. The condensate would drip off the ducts and onto the vapor barrier.

    I moved into the house (2400 SF on first floor) in December 2003 and a new heat pump (3.5 ton, 12 SEER Payne) was installed in Feb 2004. The ducts are new too; hurricane Isabel wiped out the old ones in Sept 2003. The main trunk is sheet metal with insulation, the feeders (right term?) are insulated flex duct.

    I live in Hampton, VA and the summers are humid here. Since I am in a flood zone I can't seal the vents and use a dehumidifier. Actually that is not totally true. I could replace my vents with a sealed-type flood vent but it would cost a lot.

    Solutions I can think of: 1. Additional insulation on the ducts. 2. Fans to circulate air.

    What else should I consider to eliminate the sweating?

    Thanks

    petec
    Member

    Registered: Jan 2004
    Posts: 47
    Tomorrow morning I am doing the walk-thru on a house I am supposed to close on tomorrow afternoon. I attended the home inspection (done 3 weeks ago) which showed that the Heat Pump temp rise was only 5 degrees (outside temp 60 degrees, inside 70 deg). The filter was very dirty. We replaced the filter and the temp rise was still only 5 degrees. The ducts seemed to be blowing air OK. The seller’s agent agreed to have the system checked and repaired by a certified HVAC person.

    Today my agent told me the seller’s agent said the seller was an HVAC person and he personally “cleaned” the system and it is OK. I don’t believe them and I think the agents (both mine and the seller’s) are trying to push me into going through with the deal. Obviously I need to get rid of my agent but I am stuck with him for now.

    What can I do to put a hold on this deal and get the seller/agents to do the right thing? Would it be reasonable for me to take temp measurements tomorrow at the return and the supplies? If it is still showing 5 degrees then obviously they didn’t do anything.

    What are minimum temp rise that I should expect? I am thinking 15 degrees. Tomorrow’s outside temp should be about 50 deg.

    All suggestions appreciated.

    House info:
    HP 12-13 years old, 1.5 or 2 tons
    1100 sq ft, 2 story
    All ducts within heated space





    petec
    Member

    Registered: Jan 2004
    Posts: 47
    Will the 2006 requiremnts for 13 SEER on replacement units cause a reduction in prices of 13 SEER systems?

    Will there be a "fire sale" of 10-12 SEER equipment starting soon?

    I have 2 Heat Pumps that need some work. One system (1 year old condenser unit, 16 yo air handler) needs a new evaporator coil. I am thinking of replacing the entire air handler unit with a 12 SEER to match the condenser. Am I messing myself up by keeping this system at 12 SEER if I can't get parts for it in the future?

    Other unit (16 yo) has a slow leak in the evap coil. I am thinking about nursing this along until something major blows, hopefully I can get 2-3 more years out of this system. By then the 13 SEER systems may have come down in price.

    I also would like to see how the R-22, R-410, or other new refrigerant situation shakes out.

    All comments, thoughts, suggestions appreciated.


    petec
    Member

    Registered: Jan 2004
    Posts: 47
    In my previous post it was indicated that a 20 degree temperature rise or "split" is about the lower limit one could expect out of an older (14 year old) heatpump. I do not know the SEER rating but it is a contractor grade unit.

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?threadid=65473

    What would be the average split one could expect on an old system like this: 25 degrees?

    What about a new 12 SEER unit? I have a 1 year old 12 seer HP and the best I have gotten is 25 degrees.

    The reason I ask is because an HVAC friend of mine (young, new to the business) said I should get 35-40 degrees in the heatpump mode (electric heat strips off). Is he refering to a new high efficiency unit (14+ SEER)? Can they really put out this much heat?

    Thanks,

    PeteC

    petec
    Member

    Registered: Jan 2004
    Posts: 47
    Dash: The temp difference is about 20 degrees. The original unit was also 3.5 tons (14 year old Rheem, efficiency unknown). I think it is sized about right based on how well it dehumidifies inside of house and is able to maintain temp at 76-78 degrees on 95+ deg outside temp.

    building solutions: sorry I didn't answer your first suggestion: moving. No my wife would kill me as this is our "dream house" and last house we plan to live in. Besides, most other houses in the area have similar issues with the crawlspace.

    [Edited by twilli3967 on 08-26-2005 at 07:02 PM]
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    81
    Sorry if my previous posts over the last couple years have brought confusion.

    First I need to say I found out I had been wrong all along about the system I am discussing today. I thought I had a 3.5 ton system in the first floor of my personal residence but had recently found out it is 3 tons. I also thought my installer said he was planning to put in a 3.5 ton system but he is not, it is a 3 ton.

    Also, I am not having an entire system put in, just the air handler.

    Here are the systems that I have to deal with in my life:

    Personal Residence (built 1989, I moved into Dec 2003):
    1st floor: 3-ton Heatpump 12-SEER 2004 Payne condenser with 1989 Rheem Air handler (unknown SEER). Air handler to be replaced with new Payne air handler. Payne condenser had been installed by American Home Shield warranty installer (in 2004).

    2nd floor: 2.5 ton Heatpump 1989 Rheem condenser and air handler. Evaporator coil is leaking (slowly) but system has managed to cool entire house (except on very hot days) all summer. I hope this system hangs on for a while. Will replace with 13+ SEER system when necessary.

    Room over garage: 2 ton 1989 Rheem AC/gas heat system. Slow leak in system somewhere. Again, I hope this system can hang in for a while before needing replacement.

    Rental Property (built 1990, I purchased Dec 2004):
    Unknown capacity or brand Heatpump. System looks old. Freon added Jan 2005. Tenant has not complained about heating or cooling or electric bill.

    So I have the potential for a big outlay on all these systems. I am trying to nurse them along as long as it makes sense. I also want to replace the systems with the proper size units, though I may need to stick with the Payne unit for now.

    Hope this clears things up.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event