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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    4
    Does anyone have an estimate (hopefully based on some data) of the loss of efficiency that occurs if you put the condensing unit on the roof in full sun? I'm wondering how much effort should be put into finding a shady spot for it. Also would it help to shade the unit from full sun (or does the efficiency just depend mostly on the ambient temperature around the unit, so that shading wouldn't help if the surrounding roof air were still as hot)?

    If nobody knows this, could you estimate this effect by measuring the temp. drop of the output air (relative to the input air) at different times of day? just wondering.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    118
    You will use 10% more electricity if it is in the sun. Here is a link to my power company stating this. Read line 7.



    http://www.uinet.com/your_home/saving_tips.asp



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    I've read it many times here and really believe it makes absolutely no difference.

    The biggest benifit of putting it in the shade is when the tech comes to work on it he won't fry in the sun.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,028
    UV or direct sunlight doesn't effect operation or efficiency.

    It is ambient air temperature.

    Now if you have a large enough shady spot to lower the ambient air around the condenser coil 5 or more degrees... you are gold.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    CHICAGO SUBURBS
    Posts
    464
    If you put it in the shade and keep a coat of wax on it, it will look pretty for a long time.No kiddin'

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    1,733
    I agree about the shade. A good customer of mine,
    has all of his condensers on the side of his house
    shaded by large trees, and surrounded by bushes.

    The bushes are trimmed and set back enought so that
    the condensers can breethe, when you are there you
    can feel a 5 degree or better difference in the
    air, and the condensers feel cool also.

    I think it makes a good difference, cause when I work
    on units on roofs, preassures are higher also.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    16,004
    I heard if you installed the condenser inside your home and and you vent the hot discharge air outside this will save you 25% and the life of the condenser coil is 25% longer,
    this test was conducted at Texas A&M.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

    "Never let success go to your head, and never let failure go to your heart". - Unknown

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    171
    Mrbillpro, where did the supply air for the condenser come from? Piped in from other Texas A&M buildings?

    Pleeeeease, no more comedy DIY. This is not a DIY forum. If you want comedy, hire a professional comedian!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,295

    Equipment Specs

    Originally posted by kcroat
    Does anyone have an estimate (hopefully based on some data) of the loss of efficiency that occurs if you put the condensing unit on the roof in full sun?

    ... (or does the efficiency just depend mostly on the ambient temperature around the unit, so that shading wouldn't help if the surrounding roof air were still as hot)?
    Equipment Specs show performance versus
    condenser air ambient temperature.

    Wouldn't the ambient air on the roof
    at < 2 feet with little or no breeze
    be 10' - 15'F hotter?
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Burleson, Texas
    Posts
    1,741
    The service tech that will be working on it in the future will be more effiencient too, if they are working in the shade also....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sarasota Florida!! hot & humid
    Posts
    926
    In sunny Fl some 20yrs ago a builder was putting a package unit in the attic with a discharge air duct. Drawing in hot attic air as supply. Kinda of worked like an attic fan as well. They were a real nightmare to work on.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    61

    Frown

    how about the fedders adapt-o-matic. put in the attic.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    one will save 10 times more $$ by shading the west facing windows, then the south ones, then shading the roof with tall trees! besides, you will have more oxygen.

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