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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    28
    I wanted to know what tools do most companies want entry level techs to have, i have had three interviews here in las vegas and asked, "what tools do you own?" I don't know what they expect you to already have just starting out that has been one weak points because I don't own too many. Please help I have been here two weeks and i'm trying to find entry level work thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Tech Guest
    Wow...we seem to hear this a lot...hey Boss, or lusker, can someone design a list and put it in a permanent place, it's a very good question for the new people to ask but it doe's seen to be a re-ocurring one. I'll e-mail ya one and maybe some other guys will also...choose the most well rounded and run with it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    4,970
    I guess my question would be if your an entry level tech and went to trade school...... dont they kinda teach what you would need for tools starting out? Now if your starting out without being in school ,I can understand the question. If trade schools are not teaching that ...I think they better start.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4

    Thumbs up

    *Basic handtools (wrenches, screwdrivers, nutdrivers, etc.)
    *Electrical meter - should have an amp clamp, ability to check temperature a plus, as well as capacity
    *Refrigerant gauges
    *Manometer - digital or u-tube depending on who you ask
    *Torch and a few sizes of tips, unless you use oxy-acet.
    A lot of companies provide scales and vac pumps. There's a lot of specialized tools out there but that should get you going, happy job hunting.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153
    Trade schools DON'T teach what is needed most and that is:

    1. Tools needed, where to buy, and what to carry them in
    2. Licensing laws & rules
    3. People skills

    Instead they are worried about teaching a new student how to work on a chiller or other highly skilled engineering type topic.

    [Edited by Steve Wiggins on 08-24-2005 at 06:36 PM]
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Steve Wiggins
    [B]Trade schools DON'T teach what is needed most and that is:

    1. Tools needed, where to buy, and what to carry them in
    2. Licensing laws & rules
    3. People skills


    #3 Most important/neglected teachable skill

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153


    #1 most important tool to own, cost $20 - Voltstick for high voltage

    I found this live wire hanging in a closet and never would have attempted to check it with a regular meter.
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

  8. #8
    1. The trade school I go to gives you a list of the tools you need, a map of an A/C supply house that has 6 locations around town, and if you buy your tools from them they give you a 20% discount.
    2. The trade school I go to offers a 3 month prep course just for preparing for the HVAC exam, and they cover ALL the licensing laws & rules.
    3. People skills, I think spending 4 1/2 hours 3X a week at school with a wide variety of different type of people is a GREAT way to develop people skills. Where do you develop your people skills? At the local watering hole?
    All you guys that want to rip on trade schools, where did you learn all your skills? Did you just wake up one morning and it had all come to you overnight in a dream? The trade school here is turning out techs that go on to open their own HVAC businesses, and do very well for themselves. Maybe thats why you feel the need to put down trade schools beacuse you know they are turning out guys that are going to go into business for them selves and give you more competition or maybe you dont like trade schools because the students who went are better techs than you.

    [Edited by greenhornet on 08-24-2005 at 08:18 PM]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    192
    Pretty much what you will need is Basic hand tools,Multimeter(fluke or Fieldpiece)Manifold guage. And get the best quality hand tools like Craftsman or Klein.

  10. #10
    Senior Tech Guest
    I would consider this a decent starter list, I have many, many tools and equipment that I use that are not on this list, as you mature in the field you'll learn more of what you need (Or may not need, but just gotta have!)

    Snips- Lefts, right, straights
    Scribe
    Rule
    hand seamers, flue crimpers
    Nut Drivers Long handle magnetic 1/4, 5/16, 3/8
    regular screwdrivers
    phillips screwdrivers
    pliers, needlenose and regular
    wire strippers and crimpers
    channel locks
    combo wrenchs (most common 3/8, 7/16, 1/2, 9/16)
    adjustable wrenchs (commonly known as crescent wrench)
    Torpedo level
    Multi-meter
    Manometer
    Refrigerant scale
    Refrigeration guages (R-22 and R-410a)
    Cordless drill (Maquita angle drill a must for me)
    1/4 and 5/16 bits and 6" extension for drill
    multi-bit

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Canton ohio
    Posts
    865
    My most important tool when I first went on my own was, by far,my cell phone.
    Go RCR!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,414
    Not only should you have most or more of the tools mentioned above, but talk to them about what they expect you to provide. They might just be asking what tools you have so they'll have an idea of what they'll need to invest in you if they hire you.

    While I'd LOVE to own every tool I'd ever need, there's no way I can afford that (yet anyway, I'm slowly trying though lol). I'd expect them to buy the larger ticket items like vac pump, reclaimer, hole hog, more of the specialty items. If they want to provide you with a tool bag full of screwdrivers and all that other little stuff great.. but don't count on that one.

    I also believe having a good base of tools does make you more valuable to a compy. When I started my new job, 1st day on the job I asked what all I should bring with. They kinda grinned and said what do you have. They shut me up at around 5 minutes and told me to just bring some certain things. Once I got my own van and filled it up they were impressed with all the crap, er I mean tools I had.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Yuma, Arizona
    Posts
    924
    The most important tool I believe is your BRAIN!
    After that Steve's and senior tech's lists are a good start. Although that list changes with where you live. (Example: a manometer here in the hot desert is not a tool you NEED to start out with).
    General hand tools and some of the basic advance tools are what I think are a good start.
    But as you grow in this trade you will need at least one of every tool you can find for construction and electrical work. (Including: Cement, framing, drywall, and most electrical tools).
    Also as you add the tools then you are on your way to self employment.
    Always look at what the next guy uses and see if it will help you. If you think it will get one and use it.


    Yuma,
    What is snow? Is it that white stuff in a freezer?

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