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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
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    6,531
    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Mapp is no longer Mapp.
    Whats the story with that VTP?

    MAPP was hot enough for little tubing back in the day.
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    6,531
    Quote Originally Posted by jjrr007 View Post
    If MAPP is hotter, it sounds like a good back up for the regular Aceyletan & Oxygen tank torches. I agree Dr. Z should not have tested the "can torch" in his car
    The best back up would be another tank of acetylene. If you run out of O2 get a Harris Inferno Tip
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,060
    Quote Originally Posted by itsiceman View Post
    Whats the story with that VTP?

    MAPP was hot enough for little tubing back in the day.
    I believe the original Mapp manufacture (Petromont) discontinued manufacturing it . All the new Map has one P in the name. Map-Pro

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Skokie , IL near chicago
    Posts
    1,126

    o.k.

    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Mapp is no longer Mapp.
    what is it now & is it still yellow tagged???? Jack
    B[COLOR=a friend is one who knows us , but loves us anyway

  5. #18
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Payette, Idaho
    Posts
    110
    I prefer my Turbo Torch. Just one Acetylene tank. Quick, easy, and just the right temperature, and I've done up to 1-1/8".

  6. #19
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    18
    thats ok i'll stick with my turbo torch O.o

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Edna Bay, Alaska Highest concentration of black bears in the US
    Posts
    623
    Quote Originally Posted by Baloo2327 View Post
    I prefer my Turbo Torch. Just one Acetylene tank. Quick, easy, and just the right temperature, and I've done up to 1-1/8".
    Same here, if it ain,t broke, don't fix it. Even with all the guys saying, you still use one of those? Or what the heck is that thing.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,060
    I use my Turbo Torch all the time. Most my work is under 1". Last week I pulled out my propane / oxy setup to weld some 1&1/8" suction line. Wow one could get to likeing all that heat. I went ahead and did the 3/8" liquid line in a very quick order. Way to much to lug around.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    1,241
    I'm sure somebody could make a propane torch that would work as well or better than an acetylene torch.

    In our shop, we have a oxy-acetylene cutting torch. We bought a large rosebud (#9?, maybe #11?) and were trying to heat a pretty big chunk of steel to bend it and couldn't deliver enough acetylene to keep the rosebud fired.

    I did some research and found a suggestion to use propane instead. Bought a propane bar-b-que tank and a propane regulator. When we need a ridiculous amount of heat, we unhook the acetylene hose and hook it up to the propane tank and use oxy-propane. I'm sure I get 10x the heat out of propane that I was getting out of the acetylene.

    The limiting factor with acetylene is how fast a tank can deliver the fuel. Because acetylene is dissolved in acetone in the tank, you can only get gas out of he tank as fast as it un-desolves. If you try to deliver gas too fast, you draw out acetylene instead.

    But propane has no such limit. Open the valve and let it flow. And, propane has more BTUs per pound than acetylene.

    The advantage acetylene has is that it burns faster which means the flame is smaller, more concentrated. That's good for cutting where you want a very tiny spot of very highly concentrated heat.

    But for just heating something, I don't need to concentrate my heat in a 1/16" circle. A 1/2" circle is just fine. I'm sure a propane brazing torch could be designed that would work faster and on larger diameter copper than a comparable acetylene torch.
    Ryan
    Maintenance Guy
    -----------------
    naysayer, skeptic, conspiracy theorist

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    6,531
    The getter done Air/Propane tips are huge.
    Would work fine if all piping could be assembled in a wide open shop with nothing else to burn up.
    Not sure they could make a similar size tip and flame be as hot as acetylene.
    Why wouldn't they make one if they could?
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    84
    I have an acyletane and oxygen torch. It works well. However, I think that we should keep an open mind on these things. If MAPP or this turbo torch work well, for residential uses- why not use it.

    Frankly, if an acyletane tank leaks, there is a much bigger problem than if the Turbo Torch leaks. The Turbo Torch (or MAPP gas torch) has less gas when filled . The question is if the Turbo Torch and MAPP gas are hot enough. I am glad to hear Techs using it in this thread.

    Possibly, it can be used in the following manner for residential applications:
    * When cutting a line- use a cutter. This prevents oxidation from using a torch to melt the solder. The turbo torch or MAPP gas torches may take too long (if ever) to melt certain types of solder.

    * Use the Turbo Torch or MAPP gas, for the alloy solder it can handle to join pipes together.

    What do you think of these ideas. Is the Turbo Torch or MAPP gas, hot enough to melt solder needed for residential HVAC work? In other words, is the solder that can be melted by the Turbo Torch and MAPP gas acceptable for residential applications. Is that solder OEM approved?

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