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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    258
    To all home owners and DIY'ers. I'd like to take a moment to address the issue of trying to repair your home A/C system by yourself.



    This message is for Homeowners and those who like to Do repairs themselves. Please don't try to repair your HVAC unit yourself. Most units are wired for 240 volts, and most fan speeds are in excess of a thousand revolutions per minute. Your A/C system has capicitors which store high voltage and can shock you, if touched. The fan blades in your unit are very sharp. An improperly repaired system may result in an electrical or complete unit failure. If wired incorrectly, your A/C system can cause a fire, and burn your home to the ground. The discharge pressures of R22 systems are over 200 pounds per square inch, and are extremely hot. The newer 410A system pressures are significantly higher by several hundred pounds per square inch. It takes many years of experience to learn about A/C systems, and new technology is introduced all the time. You can spend an entire lifetime, and not know all there is to know about HVAC. Some people post do it yourself questions here, and become frustrated that we won't answer them. The risk of injury to the home owner is so great, that we can't. None of us want to see you injured trying to fix your system. Don't attempt to repair the A/C unit yourself. What you don't know can hurt you. The dangers are very real.

    [Edited by ravenx on 08-20-2005 at 02:44 AM]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,272
    We here all understand your frustration. Well said, we can only hope they listen.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    12,921
    Please, it's not brain surgery.
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    997
    Come on guys! Most people with some mechanical ability will try to fix it themselves and I commend them for this! If they can fix it them self and can save some money I say go for it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,272
    Typical

    Let’s all go to the DIY site to see the ole Granny change her thermostat and the 4 year old changer the filter… OK really cool

    Let’s see them change a compressor, diagnose a control board or spark ignition even a fan relay… I am sooooooo glad I don’t do residential.




  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    997
    That would be cool to see

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    5

    Home Owner Response

    When you call for repair you don't know who will show up and what they really know. It is nice to be able to talk to some one that works in the field get some feed back from a couple of people, so you have some idea of the problem based on the symptoms. I recently got an answer to a problem I was having . Called the service man back in based on info I receive on this site. I am grateful to the Engineer for his knowledge and his willingness to help. The repair only cost the service fee. I told him about the advice I had received and the service man said would do that from now on.
    The greatest test of your own knowledge is when you try to teach others . You will fine that you learn even more form there questions, because it will challenge your skills. Thank You to all that helped me!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,272
    Good post!

    Discussing the situation is one thing

    Teaching them how to DIY is a different story don't you think?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,516
    funny you should bring this up raven
    my best friend lives in nc. the other night he called me up because his ac wasnt working right. he said he pulled the disconnect and went to pull and burnt wire off the capacitor and got zapped. it was real humid and he was sweatting. he asked if this was normal because it hurt. i told him to call someone and he did.quess we have to learn things the hard way some times. it is one thing to replace the filter and clean the condenser coil but some things should be left to a pro.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    258
    Originally posted by twilli3967
    Please, it's not brain surgery.
    Twilli, I'm not implying that it is. I seriously don't want to see people get hurt. some might see this as a chance for the tech's here to make money from someone if they call one of us to do a repair. I seriously doubt that any tech's here will get the chance to service a unit from any home owner on this board. We have already seen previous post where people where killed trying to do home A/C repairs, and a fairly new post where a woman had her small child try to start the condenser fan motor (capicator was shot} with a stick. Saving a buck or two is one thing. Risking serious injury, or a childs life is another. Please folks,....don't do it.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    258
    Tink and lusker, Thanks for the support. I hope the home owners take the advice.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    258
    Gbut, I didn't get the chance to reply to your post, but I'm glad the site could help you. You armed yourself with with information you learned here, and presented it to your service tech. I have no doubt that it saved you money and time. I also saved the tech some diagnosis time, which in turn cost you less on the repair. I am glad HVAC TALK could help.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    258
    Originally posted by drk
    Come on guys! Most people with some mechanical ability will try to fix it themselves and I commend them for this! If they can fix it them self and can save some money I say go for it.
    Drk, the key word here is try. Armed with some mechanical ability, A person can know just enough to be dangerous to themselves or others. I do not mean this as negative comment. I know your going to find this hard to believe, what with the present trend in DIY. I commend any home owner on repairing things they know how to fix. Any one with good common sense, knows that high voltage equipment is better left to someone trained to repair it.

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