Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 30
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    84

    Hmm

    We installed a new 9RC1-101A-TFC compressor today on a medium temperatureR-22 rack today and when we started the compressor we had higher than normal dischage and crankcase temperatures. The temperature of the dischage 6" from the service valve was around 250 degrees. The return gas temperature was around 40 degrees. There was a compressor also running right next to this one and the discharge temperature was around 160 degrees, and crankcase was around 80 degrees. The return gas to this compressor was around 40 degrees also. We checked our amps, pressures, and everthing seemed normal. We did a compression test on the crankcase and all was normal. We isolated the compressor and then opened the discharge service valve and we noticed that we has gas coming out the suction service port. This leads me to belive that I have a discharge reed that may not be seating properly, this could explain the higher than normal crackcase temperture, but still not sure about the higher discharge tempertures. We are will in the design of the copressors operating envelope, and do not hhave high compression ratios. The compressor had run for awhile but I was not comfortable with what was going on. I will be returning back to the job on Monday, and I suspect that there is something wrong internally with the compressor, and will probally replace it but still would like to know why the higher than normal discharge tempertures
    Any thought's?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    32
    That is strange. I think I would start by front seating the king valve, and see if the compresser will pump down to about 5# and stay down. If not that tell you that the compressor is weak, or possably a bad valve
    let us know.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    84
    Thanks Ruth, Anybody else out there have any suggestions?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Cochrane, AB
    Posts
    574
    I would pull off the head and look for damage. What happened to the old compressor??

    It may be a leaking internal relief / head gasket. I had a new Carlyle last year with a bad internal relief and it cooked the paint right off the heads.

    Hopefully, there was no damage caused immediately at startup. (oil slug from closed suction service valve, closed discharge service valve, etc.)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,093
    Go to Copeland's website here, sign up if you aren't already registered, go to on-line product information and download their Compressor Performance Calculator. You select your compressor model and select "create tables" for the performance you should expect at any operating condition.

    That'll tell you without turning a bolt if that pump is doing what it's supposed to do or not.

  6. #6
    it's an old wives tale to currently subject compressors to suction/ vacuum testing.
    It simply IS NOT DONE that way anymore.


    Have I ever done it?
    Yes.
    Do I once in awhile do it still?
    Yes.

    Will I make a serious judgement call based upon those findings?
    No Way! It's simply NOT good enough to base very much on today.


    Do what Icemeister sugested. This info wasnt available too many years ago, but it is today. And it is more reliable than the old style vacuum suction test we all used to do.



    In the thread lead in, it was not listed WHAT the cc temp was.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    84
    Thanks for all the input, Ice, I had already run the Copeland Caculator Program and the amps were right on with the conditions that I put in on the program. All appears to be operating normal but this compressor's discharge pressure and temperature are higher than the other comprerssors located on the same rack, and the same horsepower. I will be going back there on Monday to dig into this further, I spoke with the supply house and they are reccomended that I replace the new compressor with another one , but that's the easy way out I need to know why!!
    I will keep you posted.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    Is the other compressor the same model # and same pipe sizes?


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    84
    Condenseddave, Yes it's the same compressor, line size are also the same, just older that's what's not making any sense to me. Those compressors appears to be operating at normal temperatures, pressures, amps, etc. The old compressor that was replaced had some internal damage and we found a couple of medium temperatures systems flooding back and resolved that. We inspected the discharge service valve, and lines and found no restriction either. Ive been reviewing all my refrigeration material and the main reason for high discharge temps would be higher than normal return gas temperatures, and high compression ratios, and I have neither of these conditions. Maybe I just have a problem with the compressor internaly and will just need to replace the comprerssor so that I can return to a normal life. If I do send this one back I will be looking for Copeland to sent me a report on their findinds, seeing we do so much business with them because we are in the supermarket industry.
    I will be sure to pass any information along that I receive.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    Originally posted by rac
    We isolated the compressor and then opened the discharge service valve and we noticed that we has gas coming out the suction service port.
    Busted up plates and reeds will do this. Plain as day once I reread your post.

    Maybe that one was rebuilt in Mechico.

    Pull the head off and take a look see. I mean jeez lo pete's, you got the discharge valve off already, and every good rack attacker should have a full compliment of gaskets. Or your doing contract work and the boss is a clueless idiot.

    I wouldn't rebuild it though in any way.

    Just curious, was this a remanufactured pump?

    [Edited by Dowadudda on 08-20-2005 at 10:16 PM]

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    East Stroudsburg, PA
    Posts
    13,215
    Originally posted by Dowadudda


    Just curious, was this a remanufactured pump?

    [Edited by Dowadudda on 08-20-2005 at 10:16 PM]
    That was my next question.

    Along with: What are you using to measure the discharge temps?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    84
    Compressor is not a re-manufactured machine, I am using a Fluke #52 with a surface probe, with contact right on the discharge line. I will follow up there on Monday, pull the heads and take a visual look at what's going on.I will let you know the results.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    182
    Rac,

    You're probably already back from the jobsite now, but inspect the discharge reeds closely, verify that the bottom reed is seating to the valve plate. Be sure we assembled it correctly and that the very bottom reed hasn't been broken. Take a pen and from the bottom of the valve plate push up on the reeds, you can see and count them easier.

    No pressure relief valve in a 9R. Blown gasket or discharge reed will give high discharge temps, not necessarily high crankcase temps though. It sounds like a true Copeland remanufactured compressor, the serial number will tell me. If it is, no Mechico here.

    If you find a problem please post, I'm interested in this one.

    Thanks Basser

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event