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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    80

    Customer is having problem with geo system

    OK, I havent done a ton of geothermal jobs, and usually refer them to another company that does a lot of them in the area, but they are quite expensive and this is a good friend of mine so If I can get it taken care of I would like to.
    I have never seen a system like this, there is 1 well, an 1 1/4" line coming out and one going back in, the feed line comes in the house and then tees into there domestic water lines, then it continues to the geo unit, it goes in the unit and out and back to the well.
    The problem is, this summer when they had a/c they had no potable water in there faucets, the company that installed it had no answers, they said you can have one or the other either a/c or water, you cant have both..... where would you start testing, Im thinking about getting the well and pump tested and going from there... Any help is appretiated

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    55
    I'm not a professional by any means, just a satisfied geothermal owner who was very inquisitive about the installation.

    That sounds like an absurd statement that you can't have ac and water at the same time. As far as I know the system shouldn't even be tied into the domestic water lines. Those systems usually have some type of antifreeze in them. Maybe it is a makeup water connection but mine doesn't even have that as it is sealed.

    The first thing you should do is get the installer back there and explain to you why it is even connected to the house's water lines. If it is an older system I would call a professional geo well company. At least around here all of the hvac contractors use a separate company that specialize in the well and water system setup, the company here is called Environmental Loop. They did all the sizing, drilling. piping and connections of the water lines to the pumps and geo units on my system. My lines are all 2" btw.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,379
    Spotless
    Sounds like a open loop system where it draws well water as need. Then it is dumped to a drain or back into the well. Looks like the well does not have enough supply water.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Float'N Vally, MS
    Posts
    1,841
    Water table, well bore (sanding up) all could have a play in this. The first company may have been telling them to install a separate loop for the WSHP and get off of the pump and dump from the well.

    It sounds like it is going to get expensive for your friend....
    Life is too short, Behappy!
    TFMM

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,379
    Drill baby drill.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    80
    What should I have for water? There testing the well next week..

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Central, PA
    Posts
    105
    may be an undersized well pump. not enough horsepower

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    80
    I just received a call from the company I have do my well work, they went there and tested it, its good for 2 gpm, so I am going to recommend a new well for the potable water and for them to get the current well hydro fracked and use the current well for the pump and dump.... Then I will re=pipe the system so there domestic water and geo water is separate....
    Does this sound like a good fix?

  9. #9
    I have been designing/installing both open and closed loop Geo since 1984. On an open loop system as you described, you should have at least a 1 horsepower pump and a large capacity bladder tank. Not knowing size of house (i.e. - amount of baths,etc) and required unit size to determine amount of water flow required to size bladder tank & pump but a Geo unit for open loop requires 1.5 gpm per ton. You must have a flow requlator sized for the unit and control valve on outlet side of piping on unit.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Chew View Post
    I have been designing/installing both open and closed loop Geo since 1984. On an open loop system as you described, you should have at least a 1 horsepower pump and a large capacity bladder tank. Not knowing size of house (i.e. - amount of baths,etc) and required unit size to determine amount of water flow required to size bladder tank & pump but a Geo unit for open loop requires 1.5 gpm per ton. You must have a flow requlator sized for the unit and control valve on outlet side of piping on unit.
    Thanks for the reply, the house is around 2500 sq feet 2 1/2 baths

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    83
    Open loops should not be called Geo Thermal as much water as they waste...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,379
    Quote Originally Posted by JakRabbit View Post
    Open loops should not be called Geo Thermal as much water as they waste...
    But if you dump it back into the well are you wasting it ?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Lancaster county PA.
    Posts
    34

    more ?'s than answers

    If they are dumping into the same well they are pumping from, there is no reason for them to be running out of water when the geo is running except that the well pump itself can not provide the gpm needed to supply the geo and the domestic at the same time. Make sure the geo is only getting what it needs. Appox. 1.5 - 2.0 gpm per ton. There are other issues that make dumping into the same well undesirable. The potable water usually is extra cold in the winter and extra warm in the summer, because we are either putting heat into the well or taking it from the well. Likewise, the geo source water is extra cold in winter and warm in summer, so the geo is less efficient. However, if the well is deep enough and you pump from the bottom and dump into the top the above problems can be minimized.
    If you do decide to drill, why not make this geo system a closed loop instead of a pump and dump. This eliminates the need for a second well pump and protects the coaxial heat exchanger from the harshness of well water.

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