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Thread: Bill Williams

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Toledo, Ohio, United States
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    Bill Williams

    I would like to add my Dad, he was the "man" responsible for me being in the business today, he supported me, mentored me, raised me, and most important he loved me. My dad died on February 13th 1995, it was my birthday.

    I miss you pops....and yes I'm paying the bills.
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    GEORGIA
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    1,532
    Sorry he is gone Terry, You have and will be a better man because of him......I don;t have to tell you this......

    I made a comment on here, years ago about how fortunate guys are that had their Father as mentors in not only this trade, but life.....

    Got a lot of flack about how hard their fathers' were on them........

    I hope they understand how blessed they were.......

    Steve
    "Value our Differences"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NW Arkansas
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    1,288
    Twilly, like you my dad (step-dad actually) was my mentor. He passed in 1995 also. I miss him, and think about him, everyday.

    You put tears in my eyes. Life goes on.
    Signature on hold. Trying to find a real Jefferson quote I like. Others here have bogus Jefferson quotes too.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Richmond, VA
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    My father passed in 91. He always had his own business and taught me NEVER be the cheapest...if you don't get your price let the trucks sit, invest in your business and always take care of your customers.

    I was in the military when he had his first heart attack, I flew home and stayed with him awhile and he was well enought to take me back to the airport. I told my father I loved him (something the manly men in our family never said to each other) and it was the last time I saw him. I thank god every day I got the chance to say it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Toledo, Ohio, United States
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    The day my dad died, I took him to the doctor. He had me drive him in his van and was telling me how to drive. It was my birthday and we had a party planned that night. Upon arrival at the doctors office the doctor told us my dad needed to go to the hospital. I told him we would drive him and the doc said no he would be transported by ambulance.

    My mom and I talked to my dad and told him we would see him at the hospital, little did we know this would be the last time we would ever speak to him, (I wished I would have told him I loved him before he got in the ambulance). I had told my dad that I loved him before but those words weren't thrown around often by either of us.

    We watched him slip away on the monitors they had him hooked up too.

    I hope someday I can rise to be the kind of man my dad was. I am truly blessed as both my parents were the best. My mom and dad both loved me through some very trying times, and gave me love and suppport.

    I'll never forget how my mom cried when I had told her I had joined the Marines she was so afraid I would get killed in Viet Nam. My dad was proud and he seemed to be unemotional about it. They came to see me when I graduated from boot camp at Parris Island and when my dad hugged me I saw him tear up.

    My mom seemed to be in a trance and was not her self as she knew I was headed to infantry school. Fast forward I didn't get killed and came home form the Marines 4 years later and was undecided about what I would do.

    My dad encouraged me to work with him in the business and at first I said no many times. I fianlly agreed and we had many struggles as fathers and sons often do. I took over completely in 1983 and I could see my dad had a hard time with retirement and often came to the shop and would hang out.

    People loved my dad and hated me, cause I was a prick and my dad was much softer than me, hey I was a Marine and it was my way or the highway.

    I was once a a state conference and a guy I saw my shirt and asked hey is that old guy "Bill" still there? I said no he passed away. The guy who was an x employee said what about his "kid", he was a real son of a *****. I said yes he's still there and he still is. I laugh about that everytime I think about it.

    I am in this business today, because of them and it has afforded me a very comfortable lifestyle. Sorry for my rambling and not talking in third person.
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

  6. #6
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    Mar 2004
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    SE Michigan
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    18,223
    Nice to hear Terry, and Im sure that your father knows now and knew then that you love him.
    To put the world in order, we must first put the nation in order; to put the nation in order, we must put the family in order; to put the family in order, we must cultivate our personal life; and to cultivate our personal life, we must first set our hearts right.
    -- Confucius

  7. #7
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    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    One day you will be your dad even if you don't know it. That's what dad's do.

    It's difficult in life to know it's a time of passing. It happens so fast and it seems just like yesterday you were handed your first set of gauges and tried to figure out what to do with them.

    Then you end up in this business loving it and hating it at the same time cause other don't understand or do what you know is necessary for them to be the best they can be.

    And then one day you are your dad and you don't realize it because you still think of your dad as the end of your experience of that time...not realizing that your dad passed on the best thing he could, and that was being him.

    I've met many dad's along the way and there are fewer and fewer of us these days as our sons, even the one's that belong to other fathers, no longer listen.

    But there still are a few out there. And they are the ones that we must pay attention to. And we must lean to recognize them as they are lost in this sea of new technology that tells them they are just a button pusher and not a skilled soul.

    Your dad of that generation as most dad's of that generation including uncles and aunts, were a gift. And I'm thankful every day for those many gifts that I've received.

    I'm sure you are too.
    "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers it can bribe the public with the public's own money.
    - Alexis de Toqueville, 1835

  8. #8
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    Dec 2002
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    Toledo, Ohio, United States
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    Thank you all for your private pm's....it warmed my heart and thanks for sharing your loss with me.
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

  9. #9
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    Jul 2009
    Location
    st louis mo
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    334
    i still have my dad, hes 85, works with me every day. he just chases parts now but when he goes, it will be tough i see

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
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    19,558
    What a great story, Terry.

    My dad just turned 94. When I was a cadet at VFMA, he came to every parade except one. He helped me to find the strength inside to complete all four years. When he made a mistake, I always tried to teach myself something from it. I still do.

    Many of the guys I graduated with went in during the war. Most came back. Every one was changed by the experience, without a doubt.

    Thanks for your service, and for sharing your thoughts with us. Let me know when you come east.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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  11. #11
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    Dec 2002
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    thanks
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

  12. #12
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    May 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twilly View Post
    The day my dad died, I took him to the doctor. He had me drive him in his van and was telling me how to drive. It was my birthday and we had a party planned that night. Upon arrival at the doctors office the doctor told us my dad needed to go to the hospital. I told him we would drive him and the doc said no he would be transported by ambulance.

    My mom and I talked to my dad and told him we would see him at the hospital, little did we know this would be the last time we would ever speak to him, (I wished I would have told him I loved him before he got in the ambulance). I had told my dad that I loved him before but those words weren't thrown around often by either of us.

    We watched him slip away on the monitors they had him hooked up too.

    I hope someday I can rise to be the kind of man my dad was. I am truly blessed as both my parents were the best. My mom and dad both loved me through some very trying times, and gave me love and suppport.

    I'll never forget how my mom cried when I had told her I had joined the Marines she was so afraid I would get killed in Viet Nam. My dad was proud and he seemed to be unemotional about it. They came to see me when I graduated from boot camp at Parris Island and when my dad hugged me I saw him tear up.

    My mom seemed to be in a trance and was not her self as she knew I was headed to infantry school. Fast forward I didn't get killed and came home form the Marines 4 years later and was undecided about what I would do.

    My dad encouraged me to work with him in the business and at first I said no many times. I fianlly agreed and we had many struggles as fathers and sons often do. I took over completely in 1983 and I could see my dad had a hard time with retirement and often came to the shop and would hang out.

    People loved my dad and hated me, cause I was a prick and my dad was much softer than me, hey I was a Marine and it was my way or the highway.

    I was once a a state conference and a guy I saw my shirt and asked hey is that old guy "Bill" still there? I said no he passed away. The guy who was an x employee said what about his "kid", he was a real son of a *****. I said yes he's still there and he still is. I laugh about that everytime I think about it.

    I am in this business today, because of them and it has afforded me a very comfortable lifestyle. Sorry for my rambling and not talking in third person.
    Twilly, my Dad died last year right at this time. He was 89. It took him a while after he was home on hospice. I slept in a recliner in his living room. He died at home on a beautiful spring day. When I walked out after they had taken his earthly body two hawks were circling and calling over his house.

    He wasn't in the trades, but I'm sure he would have taught me if he had been. I don't know how I found this thread, but I did. I appreciate you sharing your Dad's story and your story. You brought tears to my eye. Thank You Twilly for reminding me of the rough and the good with my Dad.

    He was manly man, college football, B-17 Pilot.. but the last 3 or so years I'd come home and take care of him at night, I had to physically help him stand, put him in a wheelchair, etc. Every night when I put him to bed, even if we'd thrown sparks (dementia must suck more than most things I can think of) I'd tuck him in bed and he'd thank me & often tell me he loved me, and look at me with such loving eyes.

    I'm just glad that I had those years with him, and that when he really needed me, I was able to be there. I feel like I was the luckiest man in the world to get to share those days with him.

    Thanks again Twilly for reminding me.
    -Surf Life Hard!!!-

  13. #13
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    Dec 2002
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    Toledo, Ohio, United States
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    No, thank you
    No Heat No Cool You need Action Fast

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