What is considered low Humidity
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Finksburg, MD
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    193
    I keep the temp in my house set at 70. The system does not seem to have trouble maintaining this temp but I still feel more comfortable at work where the Temp is normally around 78 or so. At home my Humidity reads about 52% RH most of the time based on my cheap Digital Thermometer / Hrgrometer. At work I only have a thermometer so I don't know what the humidity is. My question is if my Humidity level at home were significantly below 52% would I be able to turn the Temp up to say 75 and still be comfortable?

    Thanks

    Rob


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    997
    maybe at 45%rh you might be able to set t-stat to 72! just depend on you.

  3. #3
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    Jun 2004
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    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
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    3,304
    52% relative humidity at 70 degrees is not bad at all. Based on my experience, you could move up the temperature a little if you lowered the humidity, but not as much as you suggest. I believe there must be some other factor at work to explain your comfort.

    Most of the people who complain about high humidity in their houses, are looking at 60% or higher. Thankfully you are already out of that lousy territory.

    FWIW I myself see humidity in the 47-52% range with temperatures at 76-79 degrees in my house. Need to run the ceiling fans much of the time to remain comfortable, but that's the way I am trying to save energy.

    Hope this helps -- P.Student

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
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    6,233

    Hmm Perceived Temperature

    Originally posted by robertc65
    temp in my house set at 70. ... but I still feel more comfortable at work where the Temp is normally around 78 or so.

    At home my Humidity reads about 52% RH most of the time based on my cheap Digital Thermometer/Hygrometer.

    My question is if my Humidity level at home were significantly below 52% would I be able to turn the Temp up to say 75 and still be comfortable?
    20% less Relative Humidity will make
    it feel about 4'F less.
    REF: http://www.tranerebate.com/gulfcoast..._humidity.html

    Turn on the ceiling fan and it may feel 6 to 10'F less.
    I would 'absolutely freeze' at
    76'F @ 40% R.H. With a ceiling fan.
    I would have to turn t-stat up to AT Least 80'F.
    AND I grew up in Michigan.

    Take a Temperature reading AT the air handler outlet
    and I will estimate your actual %R.H. based on room temperature at that time.

    70'F & 52% R.H. seems to be
    more suitable for a Polar Bear!
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Finksburg, MD
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    193
    I'm not really trying to save money. I just want to be comfortable. I save plenty of money in other ways and when I'm done sweating my a$$ off cutting the lawn or something I want to enter into an oasis of AC. If it cost me an extra $20/month to make it as cool as want so be it. I have been reading this forum for quite some time and it sounds as though I may be asking for to much out of my system. Most people seem to be satisfied with the conditions I explain. My biggest issue however is 2nd floor being to warm. I have poor duct work like most people it seems. I have been reading and asking questions as to what would make the most sense for my house. I have had a few contractors out but don't really have any confidence in them. Most it seems just want to swap out a system and move on the the next. Even the the largest contractor in the area BGE Home won't do anything but swap out the unit. I want it done right or not at all. I had a system replaced a few years ago in my townhouse. I got multiple estimates and was told by each contractor that the new unit would blow me away. Well it was no better than the old unit and I now know from reading this forum it was due to the duct work. I may submit a post to see if any Pro board members here do work in Finksburg, MD.

    Rob


  6. #6
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    Apr 2005
    Location
    Finksburg, MD
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    Thanks for the info. That's what I was looking for. I must be a polar Bear then. I sleep with the ceiling fan on high, the temp set to 70 which is about 76 upstairs and I sweat like a pig. Maybe I need a doctor not an HVAC upgrade. LOL


    Rob

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    997
    Robert This is a problem with our industry! We size to much for average conditions and not for what the customer wont's. We all need to learn how to listen better.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
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    6,233

    Talking Yes

    Originally posted by robertc65
    I must be a polar Bear then. I sleep with the ceiling fan on high, the temp set to 70 which is about 76 upstairs and I sweat like a pig. Maybe I need a doctor not an HVAC upgrade.
    DOC will be able to fix you up.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,996
    There could be other problems like poor return air. This would leave part of the house feeling "stuffier". Could your house be poorly insulated? Allowing humid outside air to enter the structure.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    717
    Robertc65; why not spend about $ 7. and buy a cheap hygrometer/thermostat at Walmart.
    Then you will know what the actual rh is at your office.

    [Edited by deejoe on 08-15-2005 at 06:29 PM]

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
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    6,233
    Originally posted by deejoe
    spend ~$ 7 and buy a cheap hygrometer/thermostat at Walmart. Then you will know what __

    [Edited by deejoe on 08-15-2005 at 06:29 PM]
    Accuracy would likely be +/-20% !

    In other words, reading 50% on a cheapy, you Know
    it's between 30 - 70% with maybe 80% Confidence.

    Statisticians, L.O.L.

    http://www.amstat.org/about/index.cfm?fuseaction=vision
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    docs told my wife to have RH% 35- 55.

    get a $10 RH gauge at reptile store -- put in baggie with salted water for 12hour, should read 75%

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,255
    Originally posted by cem-bsee
    docs told my wife to have RH% 35- 55.

    get a $10 RH gauge at reptile store -- put in baggie with salted water for 12hour, should read 75%
    Minor clarification-- Wal-Mart for $15, Radio Shack for $20 or Therma-Stor for $10 are good digital meters, +-3%RH. Check calibrate with wet salt in a cup(see a lot of salt) in a plastic sip lock 2-3 hours @ 70-75^F = 75% RH. Never trust any meter! Digitals are not accurate +80%RH or -30%RH.

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