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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579


    Lots of accurate information about heat exchangers and carbon monoxide here;

    http://www.bacharach-training.com



  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,248
    A crack in a heat exchanger is definitely a flaw that needs attention.

    More important the condition that caused the crack should be uncovered as this could very well repeat itself with the new furnace over time.

    The installing company you choose should verify the airflow of the system & do a combustion analysis on the install once it is running.

    No system should be assumed safe until it has been tested by proper methods.
    Have you set up a Google alert for Carbon Monoxide yet?
    Click here to find out how.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    Posts
    355
    let me correct my self the us epa guidline stats that no more than 8ppm over 8 hours, or 35ppm over one hour more than once per year, and i hear canada is really strict on co exposure so you might need to check with your local gov but im sure its the same or less

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,248
    If the fuel burning appliances in the home are vented the ONLY acceptable carbon monoxide number is 0 PPM.

    Anything more than this & you have an issue that needs further investigation.
    Have you set up a Google alert for Carbon Monoxide yet?
    Click here to find out how.

  5. #18

    quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally posted by seventhson
    Nothing like "getting heat" from this forum!!!
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Hey, no offence taken, ravenx. I simply saw some wry humour in this! Much appreciate all the confirmations of what I previously understood. I now hope to use this input to request amendment to the article I referenced, so that the misunderstanding doesn't spread.

    Thx

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,944
    I think this statement from the linked article says it all;
    CMHC assumes no responsibility for any consequence arising from use of the information, materials and techniques described.
    I would think that any reasonably intelligent and rational person would rather take advice from those who "DO" assume responsibility for what they say and do.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    831
    A cracked heat exchanger in the furnace is probably the least likely way to die of CO poisoning. Take a look at your water heater. Hows the negative pressure in your house? Get annual combustion checks and at least one low-level co detector in the living space. I'd replace the furnace anyway.
    eventu rerum stolidi didicere magistro

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,248
    Originally posted by cg2
    A cracked heat exchanger in the furnace is probably the least likely way to die of CO poisoning. Take a look at your water heater. Hows the negative pressure in your house? Get annual combustion checks and at least one low-level co detector in the living space. I'd replace the furnace anyway.
    YES,thank you for that post!!



    Have you set up a Google alert for Carbon Monoxide yet?
    Click here to find out how.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    317
    In Ontario,TSSA over see's all gas burning appliances.And in the code book it states that a heat exchanger where found to be defective MUST be replace or repaired with the permission of TSSA. BUT, they will never give permision to repair a Heat Exchanger. And to answer your question about a acceptible crack that is never the case,Because a crack Never gets smaller now does it.

  10. #23
    I am inclined to agree with twilli, a second opinion is never a bad suggestion. I have been sent to 2 seperate in warranty heat exchanger change-outs in the previous 2 weeks that were found by our PM Tech, both in these cases were the exchanger mounting plate that holds the exchanger in place in it's compartment, backed with insulation. They appear to untrained eyes to be exchanger cracks but are in fact not.....with that said if it is an xchanger crack of any description it is NOT acceptable. I would like to see a link to where ever the OP got this information from. Incidentally cracked facing plates are not factory recognized warranty c/o's, but they can be purchased seperately if it's an issue with the E/O.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    258
    Originally posted by seventhson




    Hey, no offence taken, ravenx. I simply saw some wry humour in this! Much appreciate all the confirmations of what I previously understood. I now hope to use this input to request amendment to the article I referenced, so that the misunderstanding doesn't spread.

    Thx


    Sorry if I came across wrong,seventhson. We had a family of four here, die in a home with a cracked heat exchanger 2 years ago. To who ever posted that it was least likely to happen that way, check local papers around the U.S. in winter time. It happens more than you think. Sev, I hope you can get them to change the wording so more people can see what a serious problem it is. Good luck, and enjoy the new furnace.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    manitowoc wisconsin
    Posts
    4,943
    Originally posted by NormChris

    No manufacturer has any such thing as an acceptable crack in an exchanger!!!!

    not true.......I have a memo from the pink unit heater guys that describes "acceptible cracks"I was p.o'ed this was bs to avoid warranty on defective crap heatexchangers!
    Take your time & do it right!

  13. #26
    Canadian....

    Carbon Monoxide Concentrations
    CO concentration in parts per million (ppm) Effects
    0-2 Normal conditions in and outside Canadian houses.
    11 Maximum tolerable indoor concentration over an eight-hour period.1
    25 Maximum allowable concentration for continuous exposure for healthy adults in any eight-hour period.1
    30 CO detectors must not sound alarm within 30 days.2
    70 CO detectors must sound alarm within one to four hours.2
    150 CO detectors must sound alarm within 10 to 50 minutes.2
    200 Slight headache, fatigue, dizziness and nausea after two to three hours. CO detector alarm must sound within 35 minutes.3
    400 CO detectors must sound alarm within four to 15 minutes.2
    800 Dizziness, nausea and convulsions within 45 minutes, death within two to three hours.3
    1600 Death within one hour.3
    13,000 Danger of death after one to three minutes.3

    1 Exposure Guidelines for Residential Indoor Air Quality, Health Canada, 1989.

    2 From CAN/CSA 6.19, Residential Carbon Monoxide Alarming Devices, 2001

    3 Carbon Monoxide Poisoning, Iowa State University of Science and Technology, AEN-172

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