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Thread: I got questions

  1. #1
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    Apr 2011
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    Houston,Tx
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    I got questions

    i'm in school right now taking up the hvac trade,we're only workin on airconditioners and heaters in class,we don't have refrigeraters,but i told that we can apply aircondition/heating work to fixing refridgerators and its the same priciple it's this true? as long as i learned how to fix ac units and heaters can i still get a refrigeration license when i finish school since ac/heater work "applies" to refrigeration work? or is aircondition work and refridgeration work 2 different animals?



    one more question,we were told that we have to have 3 years hvac experience to take the state exam to get a state license,i know all this is true,but we were told that our 9 months schooling will count as 2 years of experience and after we finish school all we need os one year of experience out in the field to add 2 our 9 months of schooling to equal 3 years of expience. is it true that 9 months of schooling=2 years work experience?



    by the way yall this whole program at our school is learning the residental work,just lettin yall know since this is the residental hvac section of the forum.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.C.Cool View Post
    i'm in school right now taking up the hvac trade,we're only workin on airconditioners and heaters in class,we don't have refrigeraters,but i told that we can apply aircondition/heating work to fixing refridgerators and its the same priciple it's this true? as long as i learned how to fix ac units and heaters can i still get a refrigeration license when i finish school since ac/heater work "applies" to refrigeration work? or is aircondition work and refridgeration work 2 different animals? Principles are the same, but in practice they are different.



    one more question,we were told that we have to have 3 years hvac experience to take the state exam to get a state license,i know all this is true,but we were told that our 9 months schooling will count as 2 years of experience and after we finish school all we need os one year of experience out in the field to add 2 our 9 months of schooling to equal 3 years of expience. is it true that 9 months of schooling=2 years work experience? Not here. It may be in your area. Since you did not put your location in your post or profile, no one can answer that.



    by the way yall this whole program at our school is learning the residental work,just lettin yall know since this is the residental hvac section of the forum.
    Answers posted in RED.
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

  3. #3
    Whatever you do, make sure they teach you how to work on hydronic and steam boilers. There are a ton of those in residential. Make sure they teach you how to work on the lennox pulse and make sure they cover goethermal. Working on geos isn't bad at all once you get the hang of it but there are a ton of those too. Oh, and if you run into a lennox complete heat system, turn around and get the hell out of there! haha.

  4. #4
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    If he is in the south he won't need hydronics. Not knowing where he is makes it hard to give a good answer.
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

  5. #5
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    Houston,Tx
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin O'Neill View Post
    Answers posted in RED.
    i live in Houston,Tx

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin O'Neill View Post
    If he is in the south he won't need hydronics. Not knowing where he is makes it hard to give a good answer.
    i live in houston,tx

  7. #7
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    I work in Texas. I've worked on a few hydronic systems. Never a boiler and geo really isn't practical in Texas unless you have a body of water nearby. It's too hot here in Texas for the land to give up it's heat. We don't have long enough winters. I can't remember what school counts for. It's good to have a plan/goal. But a little advice. IMO, you will need at least 3-5 years in the field to be able to actually be somewhat of a qualified a/c contractor. 9 months of school and 1 year in the field will get you in trouble trying to do it yourself. You will not gather enough experience to not sink you in that amount of time. I actually think it should be closer to 5 years doing actual service work. Go to work for a company that does new construction for a while. That will give you valuable insight IMO.
    I like DIY'ers. They pay better to fix.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmathews View Post
    I work in Texas. I've worked on a few hydronic systems. Never a boiler and geo really isn't practical in Texas unless you have a body of water nearby. It's too hot here in Texas for the land to give up it's heat. We don't have long enough winters. I can't remember what school counts for. It's good to have a plan/goal. But a little advice. IMO, you will need at least 3-5 years in the field to be able to actually be somewhat of a qualified a/c contractor. 9 months of school and 1 year in the field will get you in trouble trying to do it yourself. You will not gather enough experience to not sink you in that amount of time. I actually think it should be closer to 5 years doing actual service work. Go to work for a company that does new construction for a while. That will give you valuable insight IMO.


    thank for your imput.....does hvac work get slow during the winter?i'm asking because all our school teach us is residental work and not commercial,although they claim we can get a job at the entry level in the commercial field.....just in case i get stuck doin residental work,just want to make sure that i will be having some work to do all year round.i don't mind doin residenal,but i don't want to be getting laid off because of slow work.

  9. #9
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    There is never a guarantee you will be busy. A good service agreement program will fill up a lot of the empty periods.
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin O'Neill View Post
    There is never a guarantee you will be busy. A good service agreement program will fill up a lot of the empty periods.
    i might just switch over to the electrician program at my school.they teach both residental and industrial/commercial in electrician,i know for sure that electricians work year round

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.C.Cool View Post
    i might just switch over to the electrician program at my school.they teach both residental and industrial/commercial in electrician,i know for sure that electricians work year round
    No they don't. I know for sure that they do about the same as a/c guys, plumbers, electricians. It's the trades. I've been doing this for a while with lots of friends in other trades and they have it no better than us. The steady work is for the gov't. But doesn't pay as much. If you want to make a living and not be like half the other schluffs and as in any other industry. The best work most of the time and the mediocre work half the time and the hacks work a little less than that. They blow lots of smoke in school. They're taking your money. If they talk smack about it, you'll quit. While you can make a nice living. You have to work at it.
    I like DIY'ers. They pay better to fix.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmathews View Post
    No they don't. I know for sure that they do about the same as a/c guys, plumbers, electricians. It's the trades. I've been doing this for a while with lots of friends in other trades and they have it no better than us. The steady work is for the gov't. But doesn't pay as much. If you want to make a living and not be like half the other schluffs and as in any other industry. The best work most of the time and the mediocre work half the time and the hacks work a little less than that. They blow lots of smoke in school. They're taking your money. If they talk smack about it, you'll quit. While you can make a nice living. You have to work at it.
    i always thought the electrical trade is in high demand since people will always need power for their lights to be on and this other stuff.if i can't work year round in a trade than i will need to same money for the slow peroids i can have some to live off of while i'm out off work til the busy season starts booming again.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.C.Cool View Post
    i live in Houston,Tx
    I also live in Texas. I maintain steam boilers in addition to a lot of other stuff. If you want to add to your HVAC resume in addition to residential work it will serve you well to learn more complex systems at some point. Not as many folks know them well so it can give you a little edge.

    Refrigeration uses the same vapor compression refrigeration cycle you're learning about in school for a/c. But you work at moderate to very low temperatures, and that affects how you view what's going on with the refrigeration cycle. If your school offers a commercial refrigeration class, pay close attention when you take the class and take good notes.

    Bottom line: the higher your skill set the more work will be available for you. Never stop learning.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

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