Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 29
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    717
    We have not decided on the make of 1.5 or 2.0 ton split air. But we want to start installing the wiring from the main panel , run of approx 50 ft. WHAT SIZE WIRE AND BREAKER? from main electrical panel to condenser.?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,599
    Most 2 ton units require a max of 20 amps. That would typically be #12 wire though #10 wouldn't hurt. Just put in the right size breaker called for on the rating plate of the unit you choose.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    717
    Thanksfor the info. Now is that # 10 -2 and a grnd. Or #10 3-and ground.? I got a gut feeling its # 10 -2 and a ground (no neutral is necessary). what do you think?

  4. #4
    10-2 (copper Conductors) with ground for 50' of wire is just right. You should size the breaker for what the unit name plate calls for, but not larger than 30 Amps Maximum.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,764
    10-2 copper on 30 amp breaker,fuse disconnect at unit rating

  6. #6


    I see nothing has changed... DIY come here and get info!

    (we can't help DIY, due to site rules )

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,599
    What's your thinking on that, Ed? I've beat our salesmen to put in breaker called for by the outdoor unit instead of leaving oversized breaker and fusing the disconnect. I get the abuse from the customer who has to pay us $100 to change a fuse rather than flipping a breaker themselves if something happens.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Dothan, Al
    Posts
    3,453
    Originally posted by BaldLoonie
    What's your thinking on that, Ed? I've beat our salesmen to put in breaker called for by the outdoor unit instead of leaving oversized breaker and fusing the disconnect. I get the abuse from the customer who has to pay us $100 to change a fuse rather than flipping a breaker themselves if something happens.
    Maybe this is his intent, Baldy
    I agree with you though, ok, run #10 wire and put in 20 amp breaker, no problem. ( of course #12 would have, probably, been large enough )

    Richard

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    717
    Thanks to all that replied to my question.
    However, Jultza's reply of "we can't help diyers"(site rules) puzzles me.
    These rules state..."that while ALL are welcome, our primary interest is in serving the hvac pro, HOMEOWNERS...etc"
    How can anyone differentiate a HOMEOWNER's question from a DIYER's question.. Please read the rules again as they are very contradictory .

    [Edited by deejoe on 08-11-2005 at 08:34 AM]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    you are going to determine the ampacity for the most severe part of the circuit, right?

    are YOU comfortable working in a service panel which is energized? or are you planning to pull the meter, after the main is switched off? [ I am nervious after 55y of doing it!]

    stringing the cable and leaving long tail at each end, may be useful, after talking with your contractors. don't drive a nail into a wire, nor pound | crush the cable anywhere!

    [Edited by cem-bsee on 08-11-2005 at 09:46 AM]

  11. #11
    Originally posted by deejoe
    These rules state..."that while ALL are welcome, our primary interest is in serving the hvac pro, HOMEOWNERS...etc"
    Please read the rules again as they are very contradictory .
    Did you miss or somehow not understand the following?

    Do-It-Yourselfers - not here.

    This site is for industry professionals and folks seeking HVAC/R advice and knowledge. Please do not ask for step by step instructions on purchasing, installing or repairing your own HVAC equipment, that is our job and our livelihood. We are generous, but not to a fault.

    Questions of this type will not be answered and may be deleted.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    10
    Do HVAC firms generally do the electrical work themselves? Or do they expect that work to already be there when they do an install?

    When I had my furnace installed, the HVAC firm wouldn't put in a 110 outlet for it. They had me arrange for the electrician. (And the electrician they recommended wouldn't even return phone calls.) Is this standard practice?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    125
    Originally posted by jultzya


    I see nothing has changed... DIY come here and get info!

    (we can't help DIY, due to site rules )

    geeze!

    He is not asking how to charge a unit. He is simply asking the average current demand of a 2ton unit. Doing the electrical work by the homeowner is perfectly legal provided it is inspected and permitted.

    And yes, some HVAC contractors are not licensed to do high voltage electrical. A licensed electrician is required for the connection.

    [Edited by gus99 on 08-11-2005 at 07:24 PM]

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event