Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 14 to 21 of 21

Thread: a coil on top?

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    276
    robo, understand you statement now, your right. Seen lots of gaspacks rotted out. thanks

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Originally posted by Toolpusher
    What fan coil has electric strips and puts the evaporator above the strips ??

    Todays air handlers in the downflow position,have the evp. above the strips.

    I'd prefer them below,,but the downflow is UL listed .

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,981
    Originally posted by Toolpusher
    What fan coil has electric strips and puts the evaporator above the strips ??
    PTAC units usually are like this as well as some pancake style of airhandlers. When the heat strips are before the DX coil they must never be energized at the same time as the heat pump. On these types of systems you either have heat pump operation or electric strip heater operation, but never both at the same time as is the norm with the DX coil being before the heat strips.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  4. #17
    Originally posted by trane
    Originally posted by Toolpusher
    What fan coil has electric strips and puts the evaporator above the strips ??
    Coleman, in mobile homes are all like this.
    I've seen them do it on the gas units too!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4
    On airhadlers the supply opening is smaller than on gas fired furnaces. And the blowers are smaller on air handlers. On most units they require 18'' sleeve on the supply opening to keep the static pressure up. So its not about the air flow over the coil but the staic pressure to supplied to the longest run.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    249
    Originally posted by dcliff
    On airhadlers the supply opening is smaller than on gas fired furnaces. And the blowers are smaller on air handlers. On most units they require 18'' sleeve on the supply opening to keep the static pressure up. So its not about the air flow over the coil but the staic pressure to supplied to the longest run.


    otors are smaller,interesting,as they can have more static then a furnace after you deuct the coil for the furnace,which the air handler has built in .What fan curve did you get that info from,Nordyne,as there air handlers are weak!


  7. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,981
    Originally posted by fl1
    Originally posted by dcliff
    On airhadlers the supply opening is smaller than on gas fired furnaces. And the blowers are smaller on air handlers. On most units they require 18'' sleeve on the supply opening to keep the static pressure up. So its not about the air flow over the coil but the staic pressure to supplied to the longest run.


    otors are smaller,interesting,as they can have more static then a furnace after you deuct the coil for the furnace,which the air handler has built in .What fan curve did you get that info from,Nordyne,as there air handlers are weak!

    Only Rheem/Ruud/Weatherking products have this problem and from what I hear on the grapevine they are doing away with that short air handler.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    10

    coil on top or bottom

    First the Mfrs. have recommended that on Electric A/H, the coil needs to be on the bottom, if coil is on top and leaks, water and electricity(heat elements) do not go well together. Another note a p-trap needs to be installed so water can drain, as air will be drawn in through the drain line and could cause the drain pan to overflow, if connected on to house plumbing could draw fumes from house plumbing as well(stinky house).
    On gas furnaces the coil needs to be after the heat exchanger, the condensation will cause premature rusting.
    One reason the MFRs. have gone to stainless heat exchangers.
    There is other tech data for this type of setup the MFR. will be glad to answer for you.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event