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  1. #1
    I have all vaulted ceilings on my first floor, no attic. The current insulation is faced rock wool bats which have settled over the years, (home built 1960). I plan on opening up and removing the ceiling dry wall to do some remodeling and re-wiring. I also plan or replacing the insulation. Should I also install a radiant barrier to the underside of the roof decking before installing the new insulation and dry wall? I'm in Memphis and yes the ceiling gets very warm to the touch.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,708
    Heck if you're going that far you should furr out the ceiling and puts some r30 up there,the heck with the barrier.

    I would think the barrier would have to have an air gap to be effective.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Definatly put in the radient barrier, maybe look at getting foam insulation sprayed on too.
    When you get the drywall back up and textured, look for cieling paint that acts as a radient barrier too. I forget the brand, but some home centers have it. It comes in plain cieling white, and it can be colored for use as wall paint.
    It isn't as good as a real radient barrier, but it does block about 15% of radient heat.

    Having wall and cieling surfaces that are above body temperature is a real killer for comfort in a room. The radiated heat warm up objects in the room, wich then warms the air. On top of that, the cieling and walls above body temperature will radiate heat to your body, making it feal warmer in the room than it really is.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  4. #4
    Simpleman:

    Un-vaulting the ceiling is not a good option as the roof is only at a 2-12 pitch so when you figure it's 14 feet to the center ridge that would only be 14 X 2" giving me only a 28" space at the ridge for an attic. Not enough room for my big rear but I could always pack it full of blown in insulation. I like the vaulted ceilings as it makes the rooms look bigger, I just don't like the heat load it provides. It's one reason that I need five tons for only 2200 square feet.

  5. #5
    Mark:

    Thanks for the info. I had not heard about the paint. I will look for it when the new sheet rock is up. Was pretty sure the barrier was the way to go but wanted to hear from the experts who had more experience than me on this.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Central Kansas
    Posts
    1,145
    Try http://www.radiancecomfort.com It's a ceramic based paint. Have no personal experience with the product, but I think Paul Harvey promoted it (haven't listened to him for a while as the local radio station changed his air times). Greg

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    179
    get the icenyne sprayed in there while the ceiling is off.

    Radiant barrier won't do you any good, and could make things worse in THIS case. Studies have shown that radiant barrier roof decking actually does block much of the heat coming in, but it DOES get in, and when it does, the radiant barrier acts as your enemy and keeps it IN the house by not letting it out just like it tried not to let it in.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Originally posted by old yeller
    get the icenyne sprayed in there while the ceiling is off.

    Radiant barrier won't do you any good, and could make things worse in THIS case. Studies have shown that radiant barrier roof decking actually does block much of the heat coming in, but it DOES get in, and when it does, the radiant barrier acts as your enemy and keeps it IN the house by not letting it out just like it tried not to let it in.
    This is sort of true. During the day when the roof is hot, heat will radiate into the attic. A radient heat barrier will block most of the radient heat gain tough.
    When the sun goes down and the roof starts to cool, an attic with a radient barrier will not cool down as fast, because the radient heat shield also keeps heat in.

    I think the benefits of having the attic stay much cooler during the daylight hours far outsweigh the problem of the attic taking a couple of hours longer to cool down after the sun sets...

    I don't see how any of this would make a difference the type of roof/cieling setup described in the origonal post though...
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

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