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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    84

    Appion core removal tool

    I want to buy the appion core removal tool. Does anyone know what sizes are the ports on the tool?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
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    2,416
    I'm not sure exactly what you're asking, but I think the answer to your question is that you can get them in either 1/4" or 5/16".

    Does that do it for you?
    Last edited by darctangent; 04-30-2011 at 05:10 PM.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    84
    Thanks. I should have been more clear. I mean- what are the sizes of the output ports for the regular 1/4 Appion Core Removal tool?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
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    I'm still a little confused, but on the 1/4 tool, everything is 1/4. One female and two male connections per tool.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    84
    Thanks. I was wondering just that. I thought the tool had one male connector at 1/2 or 3/8. I knew that it had 1/4 male output- wasn't sur about the other..

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    84
    Has anyone used the appion core removal tool in a running (i.e. 150 PSI +) system? I dont want it to leak or break causing a hazardous condition.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    5,312
    what the hell is an appion core?

    I've got an APPLE core here.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    333
    Quote Originally Posted by jjrr007 View Post
    Has anyone used the appion core removal tool in a running (i.e. 150 PSI +) system? I don't want it to leak or break causing a hazardous condition.
    I have 2 and use them often, Quality of build and function is second to none.
    I let my coworker try them and he as well had to have 2 which are hard to get around here we have to special order them from united Refrigeration. Mine i ordered online.
    We both have used different manufactured core remove tools over the years.
    Appion I believe uses a ball valve and others appear to be a needle valve. Ball valve is much easier and faster to close in an emergency. Also the pressure drop maybe less across the ball valve in the open position increasing evacuation times.
    The make a very good compact recovery unit as well.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    East Coast FL
    Posts
    1,065
    C & D valve been making them forever. They are all brass and have a ball valve model as well.

    Have not tried the Appion but looks nice.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    84

    Thumbs up

    Thanks for letting me know. I really need to speed up my evacuation time and do a better job with evacuation.

    I like that it has two male (output) ports. I can use one for the vacuum port and the other for the micron gauge. Ths way I can avoid using a t. Last question about this- can I use regular hoses on both output male ports?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    East Coast FL
    Posts
    1,065
    You can use regular hoses. If you remove your schrader depressors that will help speed up your evacuation as well. Check your o-rings and or hose gaskets to be good. Get a pack of them and change often.

    They say the regular hoses permeate. And you will see that on your micron gauge. A slow rise even on a tite system with little moisture or contaminates.

    They recommend a braided steel hose for the tightest evac.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    333
    [QUOTE=jjrr007;10064932]Thanks for letting me know. I really need to speed up my evacuation time and do a better job with evacuation.

    I like that it has two male (output) ports. I can use one for the vacuum port and the other for the micron gauge. Ths way I can avoid using a t. Last question about this- can I use regular hoses on both output male ports?[/QUOTE
    I am not a big fan of the side port , i believe it is upstream of the ball valve requiring another isolation valve between your micro gauge and the system, second I try not to monitor system vac pressure on the same line i am pulling from. I do use the main port quite often as a way to connect my micro gauge to a shrader fitting. its very rigid I can close the ball valve when not monitoring or when i am starting to charge the system, to prevent damage to my micro gauge. Everyone does it a little different, YMMV
    I use the black hoses for evacuation, should say on them evacuation and charging.
    As AIreasearch stated its very important to remove the shrader depressor and check hose gaskets and o rings on your shrader tool . Look inside and you can see what a huge restriction it adds. I have a few manifold gauge setups . One is for evacuation and charging and they have the more expensive black hoses with no shrader depressors and a set of normal gauges for non evacuating purposes.
    Last edited by pringlel; 05-01-2011 at 01:18 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,416
    [QUOTE=pringlel;10065302]
    Quote Originally Posted by jjrr007 View Post
    Thanks for letting me know. I really need to speed up my evacuation time and do a better job with evacuation.

    I like that it has two male (output) ports. I can use one for the vacuum port and the other for the micron gauge. Ths way I can avoid using a t. Last question about this- can I use regular hoses on both output male ports?[/QUOTE
    I am not a big fan of the side port , i believe it is upstream of the ball valve requiring another isolation valve between your micro gauge and the system, second I try not to monitor system vac pressure on the same line i am pulling from. I do use the main port quite often as a way to connect my micro gauge to a shrader fitting. its very rigid I can close the ball valve when not monitoring or when i am starting to charge the system, to prevent damage to my micro gauge. Everyone does it a little different, YMMV
    yes you need ball valves to isolate the micron gauge, they don't like the oil. And YES, everybody that is particular about pumpdowns seems to do it differently. I, for example, use copper tubing with flare nuts instead of refrigerant hoses. I attach an inline ball valve to isolate the system from everything but the the micron gauge.

    Guess how much I worry about bad hoses?

    ...not very much.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


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