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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    133
    I had a prospective heat pump installer, seasoned guy, been doing this a long time, told me he doesn't purge with nitrogen when installing new line sets. I don't know what his record is like, but the distributor recommended him. (maybe he gives them a lot of business lol). I also seemed to hear him say it's not necessary to "pull a vacuum" either. Aren't these Standard Operating Procedures or maybe experience outweighs ???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    You don't need to do any of that... if you don't want the system to work properly if at all.

    Yeah, you need to do both of those to properly work on a system, especially the vacuum step.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Posts
    996
    Purge with nitrogen, you can get away without doing. Pulling a vacuum is a must, if not done you are asking for big time problems down the road. If he won't install according to accepted practices look for another tech.
    "Go big or Go Home"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Zelienople, Pa
    Posts
    2,965

    Thumbs down

    It amazes me that some contractors are still in business...
    How tall are you Private???!!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Originally posted by Yellow Dot
    It amazes me that some contractors are still in business...
    Some ,what would guess the percentage is that follows both of the above practices?

    I'd guess high ,as many techs/installers hired,haven't seen nitrogen used at all,or last saw it in trade school.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    3,112
    I'll bet he told you that soft solder was okay to use as well. RUN, RUN, RUN and get someone else.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    133
    I think I know the pitfalls of not using nitrogen but what does "pulling a vac" avoid? He probably learned everything on the job (admitted that himself), isn't incorporated, gave me a verbal offer on a Goodman 13 SEER @ half the price of the name brands. Which brings me to another q. that I keep wrestling with. I'm going to get an extended labor warranty on any equipment I buy to be covered to 10 years. Should I pay more for brand, if the SEER is the same and the warrantees are the same?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    East Grand Forks, MN
    Posts
    1,373
    I think I know the pitfalls of not using nitrogen but what does "pulling a vac" avoid?

    future trouble. will he guarantee you a trouble-free system?
    no he won't, you will pay for future problems by him!
    you may still have the manufacture's warranty, but problems with it.

    He probably learned everything on the job (admitted that himself), isn't incorporated, gave me a verbal offer on a Goodman 13 SEER @ half the price of the name brands. Which brings me to another q. that I keep wrestling with. I'm going to get an extended labor warranty on any equipment I buy to be covered to 10 years. Should I pay more for brand, if the SEER is the same and the warrantees are the same?

    NO! brand does not matter, it's the professional craftsmanship that guarantees the equipment longevity, period.

    As a professional, i advise you look for a reputable company.

  9. #9
    I think new line sets come with a holding charge of nitrogen in them for dryness and to keep air from infiltrateing.So ya might get away with that.I bleed nitrogen now-haven't always but most new refrigerents are less forgiving and I should have been doing it the last 20 years anyways.As for pulling a vacuum-this is a no brainer and has to be done.I have known guys that used to bleed refrigerent thru the lines to chase out the air but after leak testing I always put the pump and vac gauge on.You do not want anything that isn't supposed to be in that system in it.Braize some tubing and (after it coolsblow thru it and you can see the soot.While the vac pump runs I can find plenty to do-pick up job site-tie up wires etc so it don't really take much extra time.To answear you question-a deep vac will boil off any moisture and suck out any noncondensables.

    [Edited by madjack on 07-29-2005 at 09:21 PM]

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