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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    31
    My Lennox G11E-200V-4 upflow furnace uses a rolled fiberglass batting instead of a traditional 1 inch filter. The batting is stretched over a wire frame that covers the entire blower assembly, and the frame uses a wooden prop rod to keep it from getting sucked into the squirrel cage.

    I was wondering if I could replace this contraption with a standard filter that would cover the return duct as it enters the blower cabinet?

    If it won't cause any harm, does anyone have advice on the best way to retain the standard filter so it actually functions?

    I haven't had much luck finding replacement batting rolls, and it seems like a waste, anyways. Any suggestions?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    428
    THE HAMOCK FILTER MEDIA YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT IS MORE EFFICIENT THAN A STANDARD FIBERGLASS AIR FILTER BECAUSE IT HAS MORE SURFACE AREA. AND THE FILTER MEDIA SHOULD BE ATTACHED TO THE BOTTOM OF THE WIRE CAGE OR WHAT EVER IT IS CALLED, THERE SHOULD BE A CLAMP THAT HINGES ON BOTH ENDS OF THE WIRE CAGE

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    428
    AND YOU DONT NEED A WOODEN PROP ROD I AM SHURE IT IS NOT FROM THE FACTORY.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    31
    I appreciate the insight. I don't have any experience with this type of filter, so I'm not exactly sure what is wrong
    I agree that a prop rod shouldn't have to be used, but without it, the cage ends up being pulled off the metal lips that it hangs on and into the drive pulley system; could it be that the filter frame is supposed to have tension, and has just worn out over the years?

    Would I have to go through a HVAC dealer to get replacement filter media for this?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    55
    I'm sure your local A/C business can order as much of that stuff as you need. They do still make it ;-)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    428
    Its been awhile since i have changed one of them old critters but there is no tension on it, if i remember right i think it can be put in backwards. you will want the longer end to be where the drive pulleys are. let me know if it works out.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    St Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    3,468
    Buy the filter media from a home improvement store. Call them and tell them you want the roll that you cut what you need.

    Pull out your frame and it is shaped like a U. At the top of each side of the U is a metal piece about 2" wide and the length of the cage. It hooks into the cage wire on two spots when you slide this piece of metal. Unhook both sides and discard the old filter after measuring it.

    Cut a new piece of media a couple of inches larger. Lay it on the floor and roll the wire cage so that the top of the U is at one end of the new media. The metal at the top has two hooks that punch thru the media and then slide forward & hook into the metal cage. Do the same for the other end.

    If the metal hooks are gone get some twine and tie the media to the cage with out looping over the metal.

    Slide the metal top rail over a rail inside the furnace with the filter on the outside of the metal cage. Any excess media filter will just bunch up in the front and back. When it is time to change the filter, remove the whole filter and cage, rotate it, and slide it back in. Most of the dust/dirt is only on one side, the other side is clean.

    And,
    Look at the motor, pulley and blower wheel. See all the accumulated dust/dirt? Well this is just a part of what has passed thru this cheap filter mechanism. The rest has accumulated on the underside of your evap coil giving you a higher temp rise and low air flow.

    So, while you get heat and A/C, you are paying thru the nose for it and this type of filter is the least of your problems. You also may have a defective heat exchanger and it's time to consider upgrading. Had you done so 5 years ago you would have recovered half the cost of a new furnace if you also have an older Lennox condensor and use it for 6 months each year.

    With a new furnace, upgrade to a 4" box type filter that gets changed once or twice a year

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    1,484
    If the return air comes up from the bottom, you can build some brackets to hold a filter in place and if the return comes in from the side, you can replace the return duct boot with one designed to house a filter. I wouldn't invest very much money for filtration on a furnace this age though. You may want to consider upgrading the furnace and filter arrangement at the same time. You have some cold winters up there and it is always better to replace a furnace when you want to versus when you have to. There are no furnace specials when it is 5 degrees outside or on Christmas day.....Just a thought

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,909
    Do not trim the edges when you put another filter on the rack. It should be on contact with the back of the blower compartment to make a seal and ensure that air doesn't get around it.

    That filter is a pain in the @$$ to replace, but I find that it lasts three months and does a fairly decent job. (1" last one month) You could always install better media though - fiberglass is like 2% efficient.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    31
    Thanks for the tips. I am already planning on replacing this monster this summer, so it won't be an issue for much longer; It just took this long to convince the wife that a new furnace would pay for itself in the long run.

    I wish I had found this forum years ago!

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