subcool...more is bad?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    654
    High subcool reading...why would that be bad? Seems to me if the condensor is doing the best job it can, a high subcool reading would indicate that. It could be considered a measure of condensor efficiency, right? I fully understand superheat, but this subcool has got me wondering....anyone lend some help?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    if you fully understand superheat, do you understand what a flooded coil is? and what a starved coil is?

    go to the "for your interest section" of this site

    high subcooling or low subcooling will help you determine the amount of liquid in the coil

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    571

    Subcooling

    Most of the time when you have a real high subcooling on the liquid line it means that you either have too much refrigerant or a restriction some were . Having to much refrigerant makes your discharge go way up and can have other effects . I have seen some special devices used to cool the liquid line even more ( using evapotative cooling unit ) that does lower the subcooling and makes that capacity larger.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    so as the high temp vapor from the compressor looses heat and becomes liquid it becomes subcooled.the more sensible heat that is lost the lower the subcooling temps will be. the higher the subcooling temps the more vapor you have in the coil,

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    483
    Originally posted by casturbo
    High subcool reading...why would that be bad? Seems to me if the condensor is doing the best job it can, a high subcool reading would indicate that. It could be considered a measure of condensor efficiency, right? I fully understand superheat, but this subcool has got me wondering....anyone lend some help?
    Think of it this way. If there is too much subcooling that means liquid refrigerant is stacking up in the condenser. This effectively reduces the surface area that can be used to turn that hot high pressure superheated vapor coming from the compressor back into a liquid. Remember a condensers job is to remove heat from the high pressure vapor, and to a smaller extent subcool the liquid a little to assure a solid column of liquid getting to the metering device. On systems with no receiver a small portion of the condenser is needed to store the extra liquid to assure that solid column reaches the metering device. Too much subcooling would be like removing a portion of the condenser, ie reduced area for condensation.

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