Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 20

Thread: spine fin coil

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    133
    I read through a long thread on this one and there were opinons con and pro. I am wavering on getting an Am.Std. because I see these spine fin coils as first of all hard to get to and then hard to clean. I'm not sure I can hose them off from the inside as easily as I can on my Carrier, by taking the side panel off. And then I read somewhere that the coils are easily damaged. The dealer swears that I don't need to have a maintenance contract to keep the warranty in force. Would I need to get them to professionally clean these coils every year to keep up their efficiency? I'm not anywhere near salty air. There is fairly heavy leaf fall during the winter (mostly big leaves that can't fall through).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Spine fin coils are easy to clean, anyone who claims they are hard is doing it wrong. Only one panel needs to be removed, especially if the cleaning is kept up wtih as a regular maintenance item.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    5,305
    I agree w/ mark. Trane been in the family for the last 8 years, and they have me clean it for them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    607
    problem with spine fin coils is ,if they get flattened and damaged they are hard to comb out. I personally would avoid them. Very few manufacturers use them nowadays.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Originally posted by lowtemp
    problem with spine fin coils is ,if they get flattened and damaged they are hard to comb out. I personally would avoid them. Very few manufacturers use them nowadays.
    If the spines on an AS/Trane coil get flatened, it is because someone murdered them with incorrect cleaning methods.

    Very few manufactuerers ever used spine fin coils. Of the 3 I can think of off hand, 1 withdrew from the residential split system HVAC market in the early 80's, 1 never really got it right, and 1 has manufactured enough spine fin tubing to wrap around the earth several times and is still going. The 1 remaining continues to use spine fin coils, even though it is more expensive to manufacture, because the coil design is more efficient per square foot of coil area, and maintains performance better as it gets dirty than plate fin coils do.

    The only real drawback to spine fin coils is that there isn't a way to leave one side of the coil open for easy compressor access without making the footprint of the equipment really rediculously huge.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    1,936
    if spline fins are cleaned on a regular schedule they are fine neglect them for several years and woe to the service tech

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    435
    Spine fin coils outlast any of the others in a seasside community. Reason being, salt air causes corrosion due to electrolysis on cooper aluminum fin combination. This is due to dissimilar metals. The spine fin is all aluminum with only copper comming in touch at the weld joints. The upper end Trane and AMS units have a weather resistant blanket at the areas where the copper lines come in contact with the spine fin coil. this providesa barrier at the joints. Another advantage aluminum is much more effecient from a cooling of the coil perspective. Get the upper end AMS and Trane you get a 10 year warranty on the entire unit, plus if you combine it with a new air handler it all is covered under the 10yr warr

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    230
    Oh give me a break! The reason they use them is because they have millions in tooling and design and it's not cost effective to switch.
    Is it easier to clean a briar patch or a wood slat fence? They have found something to tout (salt air exposure) and a way to clean (by torch)and it allows them to keep on truckin.
    If these were all that, they'd be on cars or refrigerators. If you had this on either they wouldn't last long unless you had a service tech take care of it and I can't remember when I had a service guy (me?) clean my refer coil.
    If you believe that a manufacturer is doing something for you that costs them money you're crazy. If you like them great. I'd rather clean a standard coil ANY DAY OF THE WEEK!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    435
    Say what you want, spoken like someone who knows nothing of what they say! Electrolysis is electrolysis. The proof is in the pudding. Living on the seacoast I can backup the comment. I have had other units all gone in a matter of 5 years because of coil leakage, there is nothing you can do about it. The fins are coils are green, and you not dare try and use a mild acid! The units rust to death. Until you have experienced it you have no room to argue the point! In fact go check with some manufaturers warranty statements they state if the condensor is exposed to salt air they can decrease your warranty. Read the fine print! As far as your refrigerator and car logic, man is that way out there, refrigerators don't sit outside and are not exposed to the salt element, and for the most parts cars are in garages. And yes if you really knew what you speak of, cars that were left out with brass radiators would loose all there cooling fins in a matter of years. AC cindesnsors are aluminum. You could take your hand and they would discintergrate in front of your face. No more since most radiators are aluminum core.
    Are they doing something extras, no soine fin design is better just nature of it. Trane brought the spine fin patent fronm GE before GE went out of thr HVAC business years ago! They used to use copper coil! in fact if you knewanything about sopine fin design you would know the design of the coil allows the coolent to spiral inside allowing better heat transfer.

    Just to back up what I have said:
    Here is a test provided by Florida Power and Light, the corrosion does exist! Specifically look at page 10! Notice they say galavanic corrosion! Electrolysis in a nut shell!
    http://www.adsil.com/docs/pdf/AGreig...alt%20air'
    Then go check the Carrier owners manual, ther is a section on special cleaning of the outdoor coils when near a seacost.

    [Edited by kevinmac on 07-29-2005 at 04:06 PM]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    230
    I don't live on the coast and the post originator doesn't. Great for you, you like these for the salt air. I don't like them for the flora and fauna catching features.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    133
    no i don't live on the coast, the unit will be isolated except from leaves during the fall. Is this coil suppose to degrade very quickly in heat transfer with dirt or is the opposite true? I seem to remember reading some research somewhere that they still retain most of their efficiency when dirty unlike the standard fins, and then again in this forum I think I saw someone say they don't.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    1,936
    great now its bare knuckles

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Originally posted by gmahler
    I seem to remember reading some research somewhere that they still retain most of their efficiency when dirty unlike the standard fins, and then again in this forum I think I saw someone say they don't.
    That research is true, and it has proven itself many times in the field for me.
    The units pictured in my "Spinefin Flambe" post had about 1/4" of cottonwood seed, and a good bit of dirt, on them, but the head pressure was right on the performance curve for the units, and did not change after I cleaned them. I find them regularly that are matted up very badly, but only run slightly higher than normal head pressure. Spine fin coils have far far more leading edge of fin area than plate fin coils, so the airflow has to be REALLY restricted through them before it starts having a big impact on performance.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event