Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    15
    I am deciding on a 2.5 ton R-22 American standard/Trane air conditioning unit or a 2.5 ton R-22 Rheem/Ruud unit. I live in Southern Ohio where summers are not terribly bad. I have decided that a 12 seer will be more than fine (I know I have until the end of the year until the new seer regulations come in to effect)

    First
    I want an installer that knows what he is doing. Can you recommend any questions that I should ask an installer? What should I look for out of an individual when he comes to my home for a price quote?

    Second
    I have spent several hours reading on this forum trying to find out what would be a good brand to purchase. I have found it very difficult. When I was looking for an oil furnace on this forum it was easy (Thermopride all the way). Air conditioners are a different animal everybody has their favorites. I know from reading on this site that they are mostly all basically the same and that installation is of high priority ( I agree ). I am deciding between these two units. Can you give me the pros and cons of each unit as far as durability and qaulity.

    Also if you have a model that you would reccomend please share. I do not want a builders model

    Thanks Brad

  2. #2
    american standard will cost more. both are excellant units but both will be harder to service. condenser coils are hard to clean and will be a factor if not kept clean. am.standard evap coils are very tall so if its going in a closet you will most likely not be able to remove coil for cleaning or replacing if nessacary. am.standard compressors
    are not easily accessable so a lot of techs will condemn your compressor before taking the top off to see if its overheated or wire is burndt. taking these into consideration i would choose a carrier. coils are easy to clean, compressor is just behind the control panel.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Since when weas a Ruud hard to service?

    BTW, compressors dont need to be right out in front, the compressor isnt supposed to need replaced.

  4. #4
    you know as well as i do you have to remove the panels to clean both of these units. you also know as well as i do that a lot of techs will not remove the cover off of am.stndrd unit to check the compressor if it will not start.
    also compressors should not be replaced if installation and service procedures are correctly performed but usually are not and most systems are overcharged compensating another problems causing compressor problems.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Originally posted by airworx
    you know as well as i do you have to remove the panels to clean both of these units. you also know as well as i do that a lot of techs will not remove the cover off of am.stndrd unit to check the compressor if it will not start.
    also compressors should not be replaced if installation and service procedures are correctly performed but usually are not and most systems are overcharged compensating another problems causing compressor problems.
    Im not nitpicken, so no offence, but you really should wash coils from the inside out. This is on all units. Even a Carrier. Next, if the compressor doesnt start, and the tech walks away, he's a butthead and brand has nothing to do with it.

    Compressor failures on any brand caused by overcharging are not covered under warranty by any brand, they are passed throught the warranty system by a less than honest contractor.

  6. #6
    you still have to remove all the panels either washing inside out or outside in it doesnt make a differance.
    if you donot remove the panels you cannot get all the crap out from between the coil and the panels. and i am just saying the customer would stand less of chance of someone not checking to see if compressor is overheated if its right there when checking as opposed to removing covers and stuff to get to it. i am just giving him some advise as i see it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Ok you win, an unprotected coil is much better.

  8. #8
    i just believe that most condensers i clean are trane or rheems and they are usually plum stopped up. now is that because technitions dont see. cant fiqure out their dirty or to lazy to do it. i dont know so i choose to not agree with the protective cover issue.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,079
    The problem is, people looking at the rain washed coil on these cheapo cubes think they are clean. But the tight fin pack really traps the dust in there. You need a good foaming coil cleaner to get them purring. But with the big footprint and wide fin spacing on a Rheem/Ruud unit, the dirt tends to be on the surface. Lift the top up, backflush and you're clean. The Spine Fin isn't that hard to do either.

    Then there's a Peerless. Was on one today from 1967. Wide fin spacing, 4" thick coil, twin fans. Liquid line was so hot I couldn't touch it. Good hosin' with water and could see daylight through that ancient coil. Liquid line barely was warm! Oh but the outside surface of that coil was spotless before I washed it. Many would call it clean and move on. Wasn't there on maintenance. Blower wasn't running on the 1967 "Old Blue" Bryant furnace.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    11
    AMANA........WARRANTY

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tyler TX
    Posts
    676
    have you considered the new lennox series? They are built for easier service and have the highest effientcy rating.
    HVAC Contractor, Tyler Texas.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    3,910
    Originally posted by airworx
    you know as well as i do you have to remove the panels to clean both of these units. you also know as well as i do that a lot of techs will not remove the cover off of am.stndrd unit to check the compressor if it will not start.
    That's what IR's and ohmmeters are for

    The Rheems clean very well from the outside. As Baldy said it's usually just surface debris. The coils are thin enough that water will clean it wonderfully.

    And a plus is no hail damage and little kids fingers smashing fins.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,940
    American Standard, Rheem/Ruud or any other brand is best if the contractor you trust to do a good job says it is best for him/her....oops, I see you already specified your technician be a him

    If you want 12 SEER, you'd better get it now. While manufactures are allowed to build them till 2006, most production of under 13 SEER equipment is going to cease come the Fall of 2005. Any under 13 SEER equipment in stock will be able to be installed till it is gone but you'd best believe at the last minute the apartment complexes and property managements will be scarfing up the remaining 10-12 SEER equipment.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


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