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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    22

    Pressure temperature chart for refrigerants

    Hi guys,

    I have couple of questions.
    1)The pressure values listed on this chart are suction pressure or discharge pressure?
    2)Is the temperature listed is ambient temperature.

    Thanks for your help!

    Sam

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    24,998
    Quote Originally Posted by Samart View Post
    Hi guys,

    I have couple of questions.
    1)The pressure values listed on this chart are suction pressure or discharge pressure?
    2)Is the temperature listed is ambient temperature.

    Thanks for your help!

    Sam
    Are you involved in this trade?

    Questions like this make me wonder......

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    22
    Yes, but i am on the learning curve. Can you please help?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    24,998
    Do you know what the term "Saturation" means?


    I CAN help you and I WILL help you some, but you have to understand that I do not GIVE answers freely.

    It is my belief that if you figure the answer out yourself, you will have a much better understanding of it.

    Do you follow me?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    22
    Yes, saturation point is the point at which no more can be added

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
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    24,998
    Quote Originally Posted by Samart View Post
    Yes, saturation point is the point at which no more can be added
    INCORRECT!

    Saturation is defined as "The condition for coexistence in stable equilibrium of a vapor and liquid, or a vapor and solid phase of the same substance."

    That is a fancy definition.

    Basically, the point where as much is evaporating out of a fluid as is condensing back into it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    22
    Okay. I suppose there is a link to my question of the pt chart. Interesting, please explain. You are very helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    24,998
    Yes, there is indeed a link.

    The values on the PT chart are the saturation points of the refrigerants listed.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    22
    You mean the pressure values are neither suction and nor discharge pressure? Then if a tech is trying to compare the actual suction pressure reading on the ac or discharge pressure for that matter, how can we relate to the values on the PT chart in case he is saying there is low suction in your ac.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    22
    I mean how is the PT chart used with the actual suction and discharge pressure reading on any ac

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    East Coast FL
    Posts
    1,051
    When a refrigerant is said to be at saturation or saturated , both vapor and liquid can exist together , the substance can readily change state , at the point where it can boil or condense when heat is added or removed.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    East Coast FL
    Posts
    1,051
    The pt chart applies to the refrigerant when it is undergoing a change of state. Study up on the vapor compression refrigeration cycle. Old technology , the very basis of what we do.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    22
    Got it! I guess I am still not clear on how the PT chart is used with the actual suction and discharge pressure reading on any ac.
    Thanks a lot for ur help

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