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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Dedham Mass.(Boston area)
    Posts
    53
    where can I find Copeland Cross reference? I cant find anything on the copeland site.I am an oil heating contractor and has been doing some A/c the last 2 years. I need to know what size condenser to replace a York Condenser with a copeland model # 0325 PFU. serial # 82A 17359H

    Thanks,,you guys have helped me out in the past and I like to be able to get this info on my own in the future.
    Thanks again,
    Jim from Boston

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,095
    Uh, the correct way to size a new A/C is by a heat gain calculation. Then choose size accordingly and install a matching evap coil. Just putting in what they have isn't right, nor is using a 23 year old evap. 0325 is somewhere in the 3s so could have been 3 ton or 3.5 ton.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Dedham Mass.(Boston area)
    Posts
    53
    thanks for the info,,,, 3-3.5 ton
    Im not changing the compressor,,,I am changing the whole condenser. The unit is a York but someone had removed the name plate with all the information for the unit. the only info I could find was what was on the compressor. Thanks again

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    340
    Originally posted by janheating
    thanks for the info,,,, 3-3.5 ton
    But what size does the customer need?

    You are "same sizing" - assuming that you've got the model number to capacity right...which I wouldn't bet on.

    Other options which would be just as valid are "buy the distributor's overstock," or "install the rejected unit from a previous job". Another would be to "install the unit sitting in the truck or at the shop."

    Do a professional job (and the customer a favor) by first performing a heat gain calculation as previously suggested by the Bald One.

    http://www.proctoreng.com/articles/bigger.html

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Dedham Mass.(Boston area)
    Posts
    53
    if a 3.5 ton condenser that has been working well until now for over 22 years,,,,,why is there a problem with replacing it with another 3.5 ton condenser?
    are you suggesting that I do a new heat gain calc? They are cooling the same 1800 square feet with no changes done to the house. What could be different from last summer when it was doing the job until now? I havent been doing A/C work for more then a few years but I have been working on oil burners since 1972. When a 100,000 BTU furnace needs to be replaced,,all I do is replace it with a new 100,000 BTU oil furnace if they havent had any heating problems the previous year(s). I havent had a problem doing this in the past.
    Thanks ,
    Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    340
    Originally posted by janheating
    are you suggesting that I do a new heat gain calc?
    Yes. It is likely that the original system was oversized. Read the article at the link I provided.

    "Field studies have shown that most equipment is substantially oversized compared to Manual J specifications. In the Model Energy Communities Project, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) found that 53% of the air conditioners checked were a ton (12,000 Btu/h) or more oversized and a study by Pacific Northwest Laboratories found a third of the air conditioners to be a ton or more oversized."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    340
    Originally posted by janheating
    When a 100,000 BTU furnace needs to be replaced,,all I do is replace it with a new 100,000 BTU oil furnace if they havent had any heating problems the previous year(s).
    Those are likely to be oversized, too. Homeowners frequently improve the insulation, install new windows, etc. over time and the only way to determine the correct size furnace is to do a heat loss calculation before sizing it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,095
    Often new units don't dehumidify as well as the old ones with lower suction pressure and lower superheat. Also, if you aren't matching the indoor coil, the first thing you lose is latent capacity so chances of a humidity complaint are even greater.

    3.5 tons for 1800 sq ft? All glass? No insulation? WOW!


    As for furnace sizing, I remember a customer comment from my first year of selling. I took her from a 137K input 60% to a 80K input 90%. After a very bitter cold snap, she called and said "you said I'd be more comfortable with the smaller, properly sized furnace, and you sure were right."

    Oversizing cooling units greatly lowers effective SEER and oversizing gas furnaces lowers AFUE. But if you aren't matching the evap, you don't care about SEER anyway

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Central Alabama
    Posts
    466
    http://www.copeland-corp.com/
    try this web site and do a model number check

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