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  1. #1

    Step-up Transformers

    I have a mobile Kitchen that has a walk-in that operates on 110v, and a freezer on 208/230v. I would like to operate the freezer on 110v because at times 220v is not available. I have tried a 110v-230v step-up transformer but the primary fuze ( 30A ) keeps blowing. The trans is rated 5KW. The compressor 208/230v FLA 45, RLA 9.2. Any ideas.

  2. #2
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    How about your own power supply, say a generator, for the times when 220v is not available? I don't think what your trying will work. To convert 110 to 220 would require to big of a circut.

  3. #3
    Thanks. Actually I DO have a generator that supplys 220 on the road. Trouble is it runs on propane that is not readilly available all the time. I am trying to minimize the propane useage when I am not moving. Changing the compressor is not feasible because of the specs for proper cooling.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwhaarmann View Post
    I have a mobile Kitchen that has a walk-in that operates on 110v, and a freezer on 208/230v. I would like to operate the freezer on 110v because at times 220v is not available. I have tried a 110v-230v step-up transformer but the primary fuze ( 30A ) keeps blowing. The trans is rated 5KW. The compressor 208/230v FLA 45, RLA 9.2. Any ideas.
    The compressor isn't the only factor to consider here. You've got evap fans, defrost heaters, etc that also need to operate.

    Also, 9.2 RLA is great, but start up amperage is typically much higher than this. In my opinion, you are going to be hard pressed to find a 110V circuit that will supply you with the total amps needed to keep the system running and the fuse and/or breaker from tripping.
    "The problem is the average person isnít tuned in to lifelong learning, or going to seminars and so forth. If the information is not on television, and itís not in the movies they watch, and itís not in the few books that they buy, they donít get it" - Jack Canfield

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwhaarmann View Post
    Changing the compressor is not feasible because of the specs for proper cooling.
    Who told you that ?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Who told you that ?
    Local AC Supply rep said the cooling load was more than a 110v compessor was capable of.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Who told you that ?
    Local AC Supply rep said the cooling load was more than a 110v compessor was capable of.

  8. #8
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    Problem with a step-up transformer is your amps drop by half when going from 110-220v. Your compressor is not getting enough current to start.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gwhaarmann View Post
    Local AC Supply rep said the cooling load was more than a 110v compessor was capable of.
    What is the make and model of your compressor ?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    Who told you that ?
    Quote Originally Posted by Gwhaarmann View Post
    Local AC Supply rep said the cooling load was more than a 110v compessor was capable of.
    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    What is the make and model of your compressor ?
    Even if the compressor CAN be changed..........so what? Swapping out the pump would be the tip of the iceberg.

    What about the defrost heaters? Those will most likely have to be changed.
    Evap fans? Good chance those will need to be replaced with 110V motors.
    Defrost timer? Chances are the timer will need to be changed.

    And how about the system wiring? The unit wiring will be carrying twice the amp load it was designed for......this will probably need to be upgraded.

    Just because there MAY be a 110V compressor that will handle the refrigeration load of the current pump..........it certainly doesn't mean it would a prudent decision to actually change it. That being the case - who cares if there's a cross for the pump in question or not?
    "The problem is the average person isnít tuned in to lifelong learning, or going to seminars and so forth. If the information is not on television, and itís not in the movies they watch, and itís not in the few books that they buy, they donít get it" - Jack Canfield

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by markettech View Post
    Even if the compressor CAN be changed..........so what? Swapping out the pump would be the tip of the iceberg.

    What about the defrost heaters? Those will most likely have to be changed.
    Evap fans? Good chance those will need to be replaced with 110V motors.
    Defrost timer? Chances are the timer will need to be changed.

    And how about the system wiring? The unit wiring will be carrying twice the amp load it was designed for......this will probably need to be upgraded.

    Just because there MAY be a 110V compressor that will handle the refrigeration load of the current pump..........it certainly doesn't mean it would a prudent decision to actually change it. That being the case - who cares if there's a cross for the pump in question or not?
    I never said it would be cost effective to convert it over. All i was questioning was what 110 volt compressor would not be able to handle his cooling load. That's a FALSE statement. Do you understand that ?
    Oh and who made you the thread police ?

  12. #12
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    couldnt you use a relay and a power inverter board. Its the same set up these quasi commercial residential coolers and freezers are going. 120 in power inverter board gives the 208 to compressor with cap on the start. I dont see this as cost effective. I would also suggest a generator but remember the load will vary and dirty power will shorten the life.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    I never said it would be cost effective to convert it over. All i was questioning was what 110 volt compressor would not be able to handle his cooling load. That's a FALSE statement. Do you understand that ?
    Oh and who made you the thread police ?
    I didn't realize proving the wholesale house counter guy wrong was of such importance to you - but I do understand now......thank you for asking.

    To the best of my knowledge no one here has made me the thread police.

    If its not too much trouble, maybe you wouldn't mind enlightening me as to how expressing an opinion which may differ from your own equates to policing a thread.
    "The problem is the average person isnít tuned in to lifelong learning, or going to seminars and so forth. If the information is not on television, and itís not in the movies they watch, and itís not in the few books that they buy, they donít get it" - Jack Canfield

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