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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    74
    Can an electrical wire (to power up an outside condensor) be run down the side of the house inside the same space with the lines that connect between the air handler and condesor? Don't know how to better describe it, people put this thing on their vinyl siding that hides the refrigerant lines - can an electrical wire coexist with that?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    lawn guyland, ny
    Posts
    27
    if your talking diy, don't do it. a line to the condenser is 220 volt and should be run inside the house or outside enclosed in approved weatherproof conduit. either way it must be protected from mechanical damage and i seriously doubt what you are describing is legal or safe.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    NE PA
    Posts
    698
    If the run is inside and enclosed cover, standard romex can be used. If it is exposed to weather and/or sunlight it must be UF type cable. The other option is to run the wire inside PVC conduit, which is very low cost.

    An electrician should be able to arrange that for you in an hour or 2 at a very moderate cost.

    paul

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    129
    This is probably the call of the electrical inspector. If a cabling method is used, such as SE or UF cable, then it has to be protected from physical damage. The NEC doesn't define what protected is and leaves it up to the inspector to determine. Putting it in a covered chase next to pipes may be OK.

    Now if they ran individual wires, those must be in a conduit, and some conduits must also be protected from physical damage. Rigid metal, IMC, EMT, and sch 80 PVC don't need to be protected. Most of the others do.

    Which wires are we talking about -- the ones from the main panel to the outside disconnect box, or the ones from the disconnect box to the condensing unit?

    Finally, where is the low voltage cable run, as that can affect placement of the line voltage cable too. The LV would be the better cable to run with the lineset, as it needs to end up at the air handler.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    Besides stating the obvious that an electrician should do this, remember that refrigeration lines can vibrate and will wear through the insulation of wire if in contact with it.Nothing wrong with the outside chase idea,as long as the wire is run to code and protected. Call the electrician, should be easy unless unforseen obstacles in tieing into the panel.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    997
    I don't see why you can't

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,763
    Its legal in my area.

    Its up to the inspecter of each individual area, what they will or won't approve.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    74
    Originally posted by suemarkp


    Which wires are we talking about -- the ones from the main panel to the outside disconnect box, or the ones from the disconnect box to the condensing unit?

    Wire probably goes from main service panel up to attic and down to outside disconnect box. Then disconnect box is right next to the condensing unit isn't it?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Lots of them installed that way in our area.

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