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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    37
    Another curious question from a home owner regarding my new AC/Furnace. Ive read and seen in the pics from the "Wall of Pride" about AC line filters/driers. Are these a requirement, or just a good idea? My company did not (as far as I can tell) put one on. I dont see anything in any of my manuals about it either. Is this something I need to call the tech about?

    Thanks for any input.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    it is something you will have to have a tech install for you but there probably is one installed in the line, if not there should be.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    33,376
    Some brands have a little tiny one built in. Others have none, those definitely need one installed in the field. Personally I wish the mfrs would leave them out and package a decent one with the unit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Dothan, Al
    Posts
    3,453
    When using nitro to purge while brazing and pulling a deep vacuum on the system, I don not put filters on new installs ( some already have filters, as Shop said.This is using new, virgin, copper also.
    Any other time, I will install filter/dryers

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    I always put one in right by the evaporator. Like was stated, some already have it in the condenser and you can't see it from the outside.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,316
    I have noticed lots of liquid line driers in the field. If I remember correctly, the liquid line is AFTER the compressor, so what is the point if the goal is to protect the equipment?

    Wouldn't it be better to install a suction line drier? Those cost more, though, right?

    Aren't these things supposed to be checked for pressure drop after install? I've never seen anyone go back....
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Originally posted by BaldLoonie
    Some brands have a little tiny one built in. Others have none, those definitely need one installed in the field. Personally I wish the mfrs would leave them out and package a decent one with the unit.
    Lennox does that. Usually I find the filter drier still in its package in the bottom of the compressor compartment, but none installed in the line....
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579


    Every system should have a filter-drier installed either the factory drier or one installed at the time the system is installed in your home.

    For a rather technical but also practical understanding of filter-driers you can read this;

    http://www.bacharach-training.com/norm/desiccants.htm


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,815
    Originally posted by neophytes serendipity
    I have noticed lots of liquid line driers in the field. If I remember correctly, the liquid line is AFTER the compressor, so what is the point if the goal is to protect the equipment?

    Wouldn't it be better to install a suction line drier? Those cost more, though, right?

    Aren't these things supposed to be checked for pressure drop after install? I've never seen anyone go back....
    Generally suction driers are installed after a burnout which is when a compressor motor winding shorts resulting in system contamination with a particularly nasty cocktail of contaminates and acids.
    To answer your question yes they are supposed to be checked after 24 -48 hrs of operation or sooner depending on the degree of contamination and, most of the time they are not. Sometimes removable core driers just have the cores removed so there may appear to be a drier but in reality it is only the shell.

    Quote
    “Engineers like to solve problems. If there are no problems handily available, they will create their own." Scott Adams

    "We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."
    Albert Einstein

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    15,505
    Originally posted by BaldLoonie
    Personally I wish the mfrs would leave them out and package a decent one with the unit.
    DITTO!
    “Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.” –Albert Einstein
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards.”-Vernon Law

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    South/West of Quebec in the other part of Canada
    Posts
    2,331
    baldloonie.

    DITTO!

  12. #12
    I agree with BaldLoonie they should leave it out and give a better one with the unit
    If you are going to spend that kind of money on a system why wouldn't put both a liquid line and a suction line driers on. It is pretty cheap insurance.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Oh now Bald, its been done and the result is almost half are not installed and either put into truck stock for a job that "really needs it" or thrown out with the still sealed installation instructions.

    Many mfg's are installing the drier in the outdoor unit, especially 410A units. Personally its a good thing but makes for future replacment of the drier difficult. The mfg supplies the outdoor unit and the indoor unit. The contractor is deemed capable enough to supply 18 gauge thermostat wire, proper high voltage wiring, disconnect, pad, breaker, whip, correct copper line set,refrigerant, and all the duct system. Not to mention proper design. Installing a field supplied drier in the field supplied piping should not be the responsibility of the mfg. Its good refrigeration practice and needs to be performed by the installer. After all isn't he supposed to be an expert in refrigeration? (a/c included). What if the job requires a change in liquid line from 3/8 to 1/2? What would be done with the supplied drier?

    Sorry, but its clearly the installers job to add this critical componant other wise it will come preinstalled in the unit where none of us like it.

    That said, I agree there should be a liquid line drier installed on every system. Suction line driers are really not intended to be left in the system, and are generally used as previously pointed out in clean-up applications.

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