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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    42
    As I have learned from this forum and my A/C service person, most systems (usually furnaces) are rated for a maximum external static pressure. However, to really get the measurement, holes must be drilled into the cabinet without damaging the equipment. I think it would be a great idea if manufacturers would put access holes in the cabinets at the time they are built, put removable plugs in, and put information in the service manuals about where the holes are located. This way, it would be easy for a technician to get a reading. There could even be an access hole put in the evaporator coil cabinet on the supply air side of the coil so someone could read the pressure drop across the coil. Maybe it has been tried and was not feasible.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    I've suggeted that to mfrs. in the past,doubt it will ever happen.Other then very small air leaks,I don't see a thing wrong with it ,great idea.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    I imagine UL and other certifying agencies have the final say about plastic plugs in the airstream. The field can get away with pretty much anything but the rules for the mfg's are alot stricter. The holes dont cost anything to the mfg's. Remember the factory installed filter is included in the readings and it generally is included at the very opening and for supply side it would have to be above the HX on a furnace and after the heaters on an air handler. The holes are best when installed in the ductwork leading to and from the equipment.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,247
    Years ago Amana used to have this feature on some of their A coils using a tube on the underside of the coil.

    The sad fact is if manufacturers did provide this on their equipment most contractors would not take advantage of it.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    6,579


    Many York rooftops units have predrilled and plugged static pressure taps. All their Millennium series units do and I think the Predator does as well.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    174

    the hard...

    ....fact is, they will never do it because it adds cost the the manufacturing process. Hell, they dont even put start capacitors in their high end equioment knowing good and well that its going to get a TXV

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    4,264
    It only takes 2 seconds to drill a 1/4" hole. Then the tech can put it wherever he wants it. A little foil tape will seal it up. I like to write the reading I got on the tape as a reference for future service.
    There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action....Mark Twain

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680

    Re: the hard...

    Originally posted by hoozdis
    ....fact is, they will never do it because it adds cost the the manufacturing process. Hell, they dont even put start capacitors in their high end equioment knowing good and well that its going to get a TXV

    Are you that wacked out with the conspiracy theories? Dude, count the holes in the units as there are, every screw has a hole, Be glad they dont make their holes with zip swcrews. They are punched when the metal is formed, an extra pin costs nothing. You want ESP, that stands for EXTERNAL static pressure, not internal. The holes go EXTERNAL to the unit.

    High end equipment with scroll compressors that can start against a TXV? Or high end 10 SEER crap with recips? Which units are you referring to need it so desperately but dont put it in?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    6,247
    Originally posted by HVAC Pro
    It only takes 2 seconds to drill a 1/4" hole. Then the tech can put it wherever he wants it. A little foil tape will seal it up. I like to write the reading I got on the tape as a reference for future service.
    I like the 3/8" blue hole plugs,they are fairly easy to remove each time you check static or temperature.

    I always drill 4 holes for the readings.

    It also helps to use a sheath on the drill bit to keep from any accidents.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    in a house, Appomattox, Va.
    Posts
    3,308
    On a furnace with cased coil there is no "external" reading since the coil sits on the furnace, and the chart covers the furnace only. For an a/h the duct is the place.

    Trane's furnaces have some holes near the top where you can stick a hose in and get a reading, I don't think they're "esp holes" though.
    Col 3:23


    questions asked, answers received, ignorance abated

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    4,264
    Originally posted by davidr
    I like the 3/8" blue hole plugs,they are fairly easy to remove each time you check static or temperature.

    I always drill 4 holes for the readings.

    It also helps to use a sheath on the drill bit to keep from any accidents.
    [/QUOTE]

    Good suggestions. Thanks!
    There is nothing more frightful than ignorance in action....Mark Twain

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