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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    654
    I used standard plumbing flux (very minimal amount) for soldering staybrite-8....is that OK? Head pressure was a bit higher than I expected, about 240 psig but the 3 ton split units works extremely well. Pressures are both rock steady and I have a liquid line filter/drier mounted at the attic air handler. Comments?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?threadid=70226

    I wouldnt get to attached to soft soldering compounds in a refrigeration system. Primarily because of the flux and the acid it leaves behind.

    Slow torching or trying to use lower temps near expansion valves is usually worse then hitting the heat and getting off of it with a good 15%. Remember when going from copper to brass, you should use 45%.

  3. #3
    Originally posted by docholiday

    I wouldnt get to attached to soft soldering compounds in a refrigeration system. Primarily because of the flux and the acid it leaves behind.

    IIRC, Stay Brite 8 is not soft solder, it is silver bearing solder... 8% silver. And, properly used, the flux doesn't contaminate the system. I like Stay Brite 8 because it is easier for less-experienced installers and techs to make up a leak-free joint consistently without burning the crap out of everything. I'll add that I normally will braze all my work and always braze compressor joints or other vibration prone components.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    With all due respect, It may contain silver but its still solder. I'm thinking that a straw poll would probably dictate that brazing is easier and better overall than soldering, considering the lack of needing to polish the connection and apply flux. Lower temp solders flow too easy and are harder to ensure a good joint IMHO. Less experienced techs will not gain experience in brazing when using the low temp stuff. They learn to be plumbers. Also solder is pulled into the joint. When it does, it pushes the flux into the pipe.

    Granted brazing requires torches and not a simple propane torch but if I am gaurenteeing my work, I would much rather make a joint that is stronger than the pipe.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    654
    I know you guys will cringe when you hear this, but I surveyed 4 different techs with 2 different companies in my area and when they brazed a lineset NONE used nitrogen purging. So realizing this, I suggested if they don't purge with nitrogen while brazing, then they should just use the Stay-Brite instead. Most techs said the inspectors red-tag a system if it isn't brazed though.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Originally posted by casturbo
    Most techs said the inspectors red-tag a system if it isn't brazed though.
    And they should. The problem is they are trying to use convinence as a justification.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    Most techs said the inspectors red-tag a system if it isn't brazed though.


    you found an inspector that knew the difference?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,516
    i do both depending on the job. stay-brite is very good product and will hold up with out any problem. i like brazing and do trust it more.
    in tight places staybrite is just wonderful because of its melting point. only use stayclean flux with it

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    715
    If I use stay-brite8 I use tay clean flux. I don't use much stay-brite but prefer to braze with nitrogen purge. If you braze withoput a purge there will be a lot of trash in the system.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,274
    Staybrite 8 can NOT be used in some states on refrigeration systems.

    Melting point too low says fire dept and phosgene may complicate a small building fire.

    Other than that... I personally like the stuff.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    The last school I went to (evening course), the instructor put up a slide of the strength of solder vs brazed. From what I remember a brazed joint is weaker than a soldered joint (max psi rating). But both were way way over what any extreme situation a system would even encounter.

    I've done both (new company brazes, old one just soldered), you need to know how to do both. Know the benifits and downfalls of both and use them accordingly.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    41
    I just went to a Lennox 410A class,and the instructor said they tested stay brite#8 in the 410A systems and said it is OK to use.They found it to be as strong as braze and no contaminents were found from the flux.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    391
    As far as inspectors not wanting stay brite on systems I have wondered, are the evap coils brazed or soldered?
    The obvious is obvious

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