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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    66
    How many of you would install equipment that was not purchased through you or your company?

    I'm seeing a lot of stuff on ebay and other mail order companies (mostly goodman)on the internet.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,765
    never

  3. #3
    Zip, notda, none, no way jose, you buy-you install...

    I have clients that want quality, not the cheapest!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    501
    Just a word of advice here...be sure to check the Goodman warranty on their website. It clearly states that there is NO WARRANTY on any products purchased over the internet.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    66
    It's not for me it's for a friend....really!

    Just kidding....I never knew it was possible or would even consider buying one of these. Just like anything else, too much stuff can go wrong and who know what it is or where its been. Just wanted to get some feedback from people in the biz.

  6. #6
    Originally posted by dorrmann
    Just a word of advice here...be sure to check the Goodman warranty on their website. It clearly states that there is NO WARRANTY on any products purchased over the internet.
    why do these guys get by on ebay stating there is a full warranty on the goodman stuff they sell! check out ebay!!
    isnt this false advertizing!!he is making lots of money!!!!!!

    p.s. goodman is not the only a/c stuff on ebay!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    2,635
    A little birdy that’s in a position to know told me that the warranty exclusion Goodman and perhaps others put in for online purchases is a legal bluff. He said it isn't likely to stand up in court. I believe him. And as far as I’m concerned that would be the just thing anyway. What’s the rational argument for denying warranty coverage to something purchased online? I buy a LOT of things online. Am I not entitled to a warranty because of that fact?

    That's not to say I care to be installing someone's recently purchased equipment. But I'd do it for the right price. Of course the right price for me would be the wrong price for him. It would void any attempt at savings he was trying to make.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,613
    As long as you get enough for labor, why not do it. Of course anyone so cheap as to buy through the net isn't going to pay for a good job

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Originally posted by BaldLoonie
    As long as you get enough for labor, why not do it. Of course anyone so cheap as to buy through the net isn't going to pay for a good job
    Yup
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    340
    Originally posted by BaldLoonie
    As long as you get enough for labor, why not do it.
    In many markets disintermediation (the removal of the middleman) via the Internet is driving reduced margins for sellers and lower prices for the end user.

    Current impediments to direct-to-consumer sales of HVAC equipment - and air conditioning systems in particular - include:

    o The need for specialized tools and skills (tasks such as brazing, system evacuation, charging, etc. comes to mind)

    o The requirement for EPA licensing for purchase of CFC refrigerants.

    o Complexity of handling warranty and repair issues.

    o And then of course, most equipment manufacturers won't currently sell direct to the public.

    While I wouldn't be comfortable recommending that my friends and family buy their own system and subcontact out the installation, all it will take is for one or more equipment makers to decide to go 'direct' and for them to design their equipment for installation and subsequent repair by the end user.

    This scenario (quick-connect fittings, pre-charged linesets, etc.) is quite common in the marine air conditioning industry, and I know more than one boater that has successfully self-installed a marine air conditioner bought over the 'net.

    Could it happen to us?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Originally posted by travisfl
    Originally posted by BaldLoonie
    As long as you get enough for labor, why not do it.
    In many markets disintermediation (the removal of the middleman) via the Internet is driving reduced margins for sellers and lower prices for the end user.

    Current impediments to direct-to-consumer sales of HVAC equipment - and air conditioning systems in particular - include:

    o The need for specialized tools and skills (tasks such as brazing, system evacuation, charging, etc. comes to mind)

    o The requirement for EPA licensing for purchase of CFC refrigerants.

    o Complexity of handling warranty and repair issues.

    o And then of course, most equipment manufacturers won't currently sell direct to the public.

    While I wouldn't be comfortable recommending that my friends and family buy their own system and subcontact out the installation, all it will take is for one or more equipment makers to decide to go 'direct' and for them to design their equipment for installation and subsequent repair by the end user.

    This scenario (quick-connect fittings, pre-charged linesets, etc.) is quite common in the marine air conditioning industry, and I know more than one boater that has successfully self-installed a marine air conditioner bought over the 'net.

    Could it happen to us?
    Big Box retailer by me used to sell homeowner grade furnaces, cased coils, condensers and precharged linesets. All in stock, on the shelf. If it wasn't there (like 90% or 12 SEER), it could be ordered. These items were sold without needing a license, probably due to the precharged nature of things.

    All that went away when a big name HVAC equipment manufacturer came on board offering installs. I suspect that the "home grown" stuff would interfere with the high markup "professionally installed" stuff.

    How is it different if a homeowner provides the equipment and only seeks labor services? Many big commercial retailers do the same thing when a new store is built- they cut out the HVAC guys profits on the equipment, sometimes the ductwork, too. Manufacturers of the equipment do not care, they still made the sale.

    A GC became a Lennox distributor so he could buy the equipment direct, yet the company I work for is responsible for the installation. At least we supply the ductwork.

    One store chain even made the HVAC contractor responsible for duct damage until the store was turned over. The HVAC contractor did not supply the duct, made no profit on the duct material, yet had to replace sections damaged by other trades. How's that for screwy?

    One production home builder in my area (they are nationwide, too) provides the lumber and the windows, the carpenter provides only the labor.

    Warrantees are just things printed on fancy paper. There is always some wiggle room somewhere.

    Most consumers do not care, as long as it is cheap and works right now. How many times have you heard "I am selling the house...".

    If the pro's turn up their noses to the work, someone else will do it.
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,868
    If you have nothing to do I can see installing these systems for labor only but why would you do it if there is a list of installs backed up for a month that you sold the equipment for. When I get these calls I tell them when I get slow we will look at it and so far its never been that slow.

  13. #13
    Senior Tech Guest
    I'll install their equipment when the local restaurant let's me bring in my own eggs to be fried....nope, I'm lying, not even then.

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