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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    74
    I have a home theater room that I want to have a central air supply duct installed. Being that this is a home theater room, I do not want noise to escape and thus, will be installing a solid-core door with weather-stripping (i.e., no door with undercut at the bottom to allow air to escape). I also have a single-large return in the hallway. Here is my question:

    With no return duct in that room and with the door closed, will the room get cool just by cold air entering it from the supply duct?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Zelienople, Pa
    Posts
    2,965
    No.
    You will need a Manual J and D ran on the room and an individual zone control for the room.

    My guess is you will take the cheap route, add a supply, and complain until you move out of the house...
    How tall are you Private???!!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    I think you've already answered your own question...

    "no door with undercut at the bottom to allow air to escape"

    Without any way for the air to leave the room, there's no way to put air in the room. At the very least, you need to put some sort of way for the air to leave the room.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    1,209
    Performance will be poor with no return path.
    Proud supporter of Springfield Millers and Oregon Ducks.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    1,209
    Originally posted by Yellow Dot


    My guess is you will take the cheap route, add a supply, and complain until you move out of the house... [/B]

    Ouch

    Where did you get that from?

    My guess is he want's a quite room.

    Proud supporter of Springfield Millers and Oregon Ducks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    no door with undercut at the bottom to allow air to escape"

    Without any way for the air to leave the room, there's no way to put air in the room. At the very least, you need to put some sort of way for the air to leave the room.

    Yea but he knew that before he posted . I am going with Yellow Dot

    the real answer is :My guess is you will take the cheap route, add a supply, and complain until you move out of the house..

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    74
    Sounds like maybe I should go with a mini-split or space-pak (high velocity) system? Or maybe I can just leave the door slightly ajar.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    Like that air gap under the door will really affect your home theaters sound

  9. #9
    I think the point was to keep the sound in the room.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    74
    --->Without any way for the air to leave the room, there's no way to put air in the room. At the very least, you need to put some sort of way for the air to leave the room. <---

    Well the room can't be air tight. Are you saying the air handler will blow the air down the ductwork, heading for that room, but it won't go in the room just because there isn't the same amount of air leaving the room?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,701
    that is correct. if air cannot easily flow into closed room it will go into other rooms that it can

  12. #12
    If air could not leave and still entered, you could have the world's first home theater/hyperbaric chamber.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    Mxylpik2: yep, you're got it right about the airflow... Imagine the room as a water jug. Try to add water to an already full jug. Without anywhere for the new water to go, you're not going to be getting much new water into it.

    Without seeing the space, it's difficult to say what the best option is, but high velocity usually = high noise. I usually oversize diffusers/registers substantially to reduce noise. Mini-splits are quiet(ish), but most still make noise. Mitsu does make some commerical mini-splits which can be ducted, and there's all sorts of silencing techniques which exist.

    What level home theater is this? Are we talking a room with a TV & home theater in a box? A big-screen TV & component system? A whole custom room w/custom theater seats, projector, and rack-mounted equipment? This makes a difference in both terms of additional heat load and what your budget probably is. Projectors, Class A amps, and isolation transformers all are practically space heaters.

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