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  1. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Fremont, Indiana
    Posts
    1,426
    Quote Originally Posted by Greend88 View Post
    Around here average would probably be 41-45/hr with benefits for Union, Haven't seen a non-union pay even close to 1/4 that around here. But yet they charge pretty close per hour on the job as most union company's. Sounds like greed to me.... I was making 39.6/hr gross. 24.6/hr on the check at the local refinery here, and the company I worked for only made around 10-15/hr off of me.

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  2. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    40
    I'm making 13.50 out of trade school with a review in 30 days and every 3 months. Got the job this week. Hope this helps.

  3. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Posts
    2

    Hourly Rate

    I started out at $12/hr right out of tech school. I did have my associates degree and went back to school and got certified and also got my Universal certification. My advice would be to not be to picky because the real money will be made one you have actual field experience and you are capable of troubleshooting equipment. But i wouldn't accept anything less than $10 an hour with tech school experience. You make more than 8 an hour working for grocery stores. The key to starting at $10/hr or more is to sell yourself to potential employers. Even though employers have jobs to offer you need to make it very apparent that you offer skills that they can leverage off to make much more off from you every hour than you will be making each hour.

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    8

    average service tech. hourly rate?

    An apprentice service techniciean isn't a good idea. Why not start them in installation and let them develop an all around understanding of proper and improper systems, move them into P&M later and let them mature into a full fledged technician. Hire decent human beings with a good work ethic, moral conscience and people skills and then teach them HVAC. Technical abilities are only half of what you really need. I'd start them all, when fresh out of an HVAC program, at $9 on a 30 day trial basis and regularly evaluate as they develop. Low starting salary with frequent raises on merit keeps them interested and you from over-paying.

  5. #57
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    N.E. Indiana
    Posts
    879
    One thing I hear from employers is, they don't like guys that "move around" from co. to co.

    IF you are going to start a apprentice out at McD's wages, what do you REALLY expect? If a guy/gal goes out and gets the required certs, gets a classroom education, and comes to the table with basic minium tools, they have already INVESTED into their future.

    A new person starting out, is gonna do the undesireable work. Digging holes, running ductwork, pushing a broom and other assorted grunt work. Get it? GRUNT work. Yes, every person needs to know how to do the grunt work.

    You have to consider though, that if UNSKILLED and uneducated labor is paying 8-9 bucks an hour WHY would someone want to work for you for the same, maybe less, and work alot harder!

    Most of us have student loans to pay for, in addition to the bills at home. IF you were talking about some kid that still lives to home, then I can SEE paying some less. But for a person with bills, minimum wage or barely above it doesn't cut it.

    It kinda goes to the other side of te coin, when Mike Rowe was talking about a shortage of skilled labor. Who in the right mind would want to get educated and invest in various things to be a HVAC tech to make just over minimum wage? Sure, most people lOVE what they do. So far, I love hvac too. Love the science and challenges it presents. However, the attitudes of a guy having to work for peanuts doesn't appeal at all. Isn't going into the HVAC trade SUPPOSED to be a step or two ABOVE "welcome to Wal-mart" or "Do you want fries with that?"

  6. #58
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    san pedro ca.
    Posts
    362
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacman14 View Post
    i start all of my new hires off at 8 an hour, and evaluate at 30 days, i know within 30 days if its someone i want to invest in or if its time to take a loss and move on, the guys that are willing to attend training and work afters hours i keep on, the ones who only dream of changing filters and riding in the truck all day, i cut loose, the starting salary seperates the men from the boys in this industry!!
    Since when is working overtime a necessity to being a good worker? Maybe the guys got kids he needs to tend too., which would be a good quality in an employee; taking care of his family. Oh and being willing to work for a poverty hourly rate of eight bucks an hour is considered a man in your eyes? I would think him more of a man telling you Hell no Ill go with the slave driver up the street for 11 bucks an hour.

  7. #59
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    8
    Careers are built, not granted. Work your way up.

  8. #60
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    san pedro ca.
    Posts
    362
    Quote Originally Posted by freemind View Post
    One thing I hear from employers is, they don't like guys that "move around" from co. to co.

    IF you are going to start a apprentice out at McD's wages, what do you REALLY expect? If a guy/gal goes out and gets the required certs, gets a classroom education, and comes to the table with basic minium tools, they have already INVESTED into their future.

    A new person starting out, is gonna do the undesireable work. Digging holes, running ductwork, pushing a broom and other assorted grunt work. Get it? GRUNT work. Yes, every person needs to know how to do the grunt work.

    You have to consider though, that if UNSKILLED and uneducated labor is paying 8-9 bucks an hour WHY would someone want to work for you for the same, maybe less, and work alot harder!

    Most of us have student loans to pay for, in addition to the bills at home. IF you were talking about some kid that still lives to home, then I can SEE paying some less. But for a person with bills, minimum wage or barely above it doesn't cut it.

    It kinda goes to the other side of te coin, when Mike Rowe was talking about a shortage of skilled labor. Who in the right mind would want to get educated and invest in various things to be a HVAC tech to make just over minimum wage? Sure, most people lOVE what they do. So far, I love hvac too. Love the science and challenges it presents. However, the attitudes of a guy having to work for peanuts doesn't appeal at all. Isn't going into the HVAC trade SUPPOSED to be a step or two ABOVE "welcome to Wal-mart" or "Do you want fries with that?"
    Good points, I am a little more "street" in my posts. Would you like some ductboard with that?

  9. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    san pedro ca.
    Posts
    362
    Quote Originally Posted by T Hart View Post
    Careers are built, not granted. Work your way up.
    Work your way up starting with the contractor from the gutter. Let me guess your guys last two weeks.

  10. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    8
    35 years so far !

  11. #63
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    N.E. Indiana
    Posts
    879
    Quote Originally Posted by T Hart View Post
    Careers are built, not granted. Work your way up.
    You're right. However, bills don't get paid on future wages. They get paid in the here and now.

    I see nothing wrong with starting at the bottom. However, can you not see the irony in paying an educated worker whom has invested much, the same as unskilled and likely uneducated labor that asks if you want fries with your burger?

    I don't think I was ever suggesting that a employee should be granted a career. I am suggesting that IF we want to keep skilled labor then we should pay them BETTER than wal-mart or McD's would pay them. I don't see what could be confusing about that.

  12. #64
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    8
    Maybe we should clarify what area you live in. $9 is good starting pay in Appalachia Where there are few jobs and the cost of living is lower., but is laughable in New York City.

  13. #65
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    8
    Let's clarify where you live. In New York $9 is laughable, in Appalachia it's acceptable. Also, what other work experience do you have ? An ex- plumber or Electrician may warrant more entry salary than someone with no background or experience.

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