Houston: 3.5 tons for 5,200 sq ft house? - Page 2
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  1. #14
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    Nov 2003
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    125
    Interesting.

    That's gonna be a monstrous duck layout...does it have enough oompah to blow air out the last boot?

    10' & 9' ceilings gonna take a lot of ceiling fans to bust up the stratification.

    Kids ain't gonna leave the sliding glass patio doors open are they?

    I'd like to see that built as spec'd and see how it works.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    626
    The other big question on the theoretical home is : are the ducts and air handler inside conditioned space? If they are, then a 3 ton will work fine. For all those like mrbillpro that don't think it will work, I suggest they visit some Building America homes in his area and talk to the customers that bought them. He also might want to read Home Energy magazine (july/August 05) just out, about a customer in West Columbia, Texas. People are becoming more educated through the internet and demand it be done right. The old "insufficient air movement" b.s. and "I have been doing it this way for 25 years" won't cut it anymore.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
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    15,774
    Originally posted by uktra
    Th For all those like mrbillpro that don't think it will work, I suggest they visit some Building America homes in his area and talk to the customers that bought them. He also might want to read Home Energy magazine (july/August 05) just out, about a customer in West Columbia, Texas.
    I don't have read anything you install a 3.5 ton in Houston on 5200 sq .ft. and unless you building it in a cave you won't be comfortable, and I could care less what really anyone thinks I just want the address when you get er" done so I can go by and check out how happy the customer is, that is called proof the hell with all that manual J and D in Houston you will not be comfortable with a 3.5 ton on 5200 sq .ft. unless you have no glass and use R-600 insulation and your inside a cave I work around this everyday in Houston but hey you know better than me go for it!
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

    "Never let success go to your head, and never let failure go to your heart". - Unknown

  4. #17
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    May 2002
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    Colorado
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    697
    Originally posted by uktra
    The other big question on the theoretical home is : are the ducts and air handler inside conditioned space? If they are, then a 3 ton will work fine. ....
    It was figured with attic ducts for the 2nd floor - R6.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    253
    Originally posted by Panama
    Originally posted by uktra
    The other big question on the theoretical home is : are the ducts and air handler inside conditioned space? If they are, then a 3 ton will work fine. ....
    It was figured with attic ducts for the 2nd floor - R6.
    Be aware that 3 tons nominal is probably really 2.5 tons at high outside temperatures ( when you need capacity the most ).

  6. #19
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Colorado
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    697
    Originally posted by dash
    When you size for 75 indoor,most "rating" need to be adjusted ,as they are the capacity at 80 indoors ,not 75 indoors ,this can easily be a 1/2 ton difference.

    In my post above ,that's what I was refering to in #1.I thought Panama ,had made the adjustment,and selected a 3.5 ton based on the adjustment.

    I don't think you'll find a 3 ton that will handle the load as stated.

    [Edited by dash on 06-29-2005 at 03:38 PM]
    Dash,

    The "Lennox Engineering Data" I have has indoor DBs of 75 F 80 F, and 85 F. Thus, no adjustments are needed.


  7. #20
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    Aug 2002
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    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
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    18,836
    Originally posted by Panama
    Originally posted by dash
    When you size for 75 indoor,most "rating" need to be adjusted ,as they are the capacity at 80 indoors ,not 75 indoors ,this can easily be a 1/2 ton difference.

    In my post above ,that's what I was refering to in #1.I thought Panama ,had made the adjustment,and selected a 3.5 ton based on the adjustment.

    I don't think you'll find a 3 ton that will handle the load as stated.

    [Edited by dash on 06-29-2005 at 03:38 PM]
    Dash,

    The "Lennox Engineering Data" I have has indoor DBs of 75 F 80 F, and 85 F. Thus, no adjustments are needed.

    Lennox should get a Gold Star, if the commonly provide the data needed that way,I wish they all did.Hoping ARI will start doing it.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
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    4,566
    A big problem i see is the fact that the air aroung a condenser gets about 10 degrees hotter than the ambient. So look at the numbers with 120 to 130 degree condensing temps for the outdoor unit and your 3 ton is not 2.5 tons.
    Aire Serv of SW Connecticut- Gas heat, dual fuel and central a/c systems installed and serviced

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Houston Tx
    Posts
    344
    House built in Spring tx ( slighlty outside and north of houston) 3200 sq ft, single story insulated it with Icynene, (expanding foam insulation) Sealed the attic NO OUTSIDE AIR IN THERE, 3.5 tons maintains temp and 50% humidity, THis stuff is the up and coming thing,

  10. #23
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Colorado
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    697
    Originally posted by tuccillo
    Originally posted by Panama
    Originally posted by uktra
    The other big question on the theoretical home is : are the ducts and air handler inside conditioned space? If they are, then a 3 ton will work fine. ....
    It was figured with attic ducts for the 2nd floor - R6.
    Be aware that 3 tons nominal is probably really 2.5 tons at high outside temperatures ( when you need capacity the most ).
    The engineering data shows about a 5% drop in total capacity when the outdoor DB rises from 95 F to 105F. Most of the drop is in latent capacity, and so the sensible capacity drops only about 3%. The increase in cooling load is far more pronounced -- about 25%.

  11. #24
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    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    15,774
    Slice:
    House built in Spring tx ( slighlty outside and north of houston) 3200 sq ft, single story insulated it with Icynene, (expanding foam insulation) Sealed the attic NO OUTSIDE AIR IN THERE, 3.5 tons maintains temp and 50% humidity, THis stuff is the up and coming thing,


    He is talking about 2000 sq. ft more than that with a 3.5 ton lots of difference there, as I said I will be here waiting let me know when you get that 3.5 ton on that 5200 sq.ft. home and I want to hear the customers feedback after a hot June like we have had were it's 100 and the humidity is 100% and he gets a couple high light bills because the unit will have to run 24/7.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

    "Never let success go to your head, and never let failure go to your heart". - Unknown

  12. #25
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    697
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by dash
    [B]
    Originally posted by Panama
    Originally posted by dash
    Dash,

    The "Lennox Engineering Data" I have has indoor DBs of 75 F 80 F, and 85 F. Thus, no adjustments are needed.

    Lennox should get a Gold Star, if the commonly provide the data needed that way,I wish they all did. Hoping ARI will start doing it.
    I think they all provide such data. I have some from Trane, and I think Goodman/Amana has it on their internet site.

    I suspect Lennox provides it only to their dealers.

  13. #26
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    May 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    697
    Originally posted by Freezeking2000
    A big problem i see is the fact that the air aroung a condenser gets about 10 degrees hotter than the ambient. So look at the numbers with 120 to 130 degree condensing temps for the outdoor unit and your 3 ton is not 2.5 tons.
    Those wonderful Texas alleys!

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