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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    39
    My question for the day is why do you not see more oil lines run overhead as opposed to being buried in concrete? Seems to me it would be easier and cheaper time wise to do it this way.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,708
    Because you add lift coming and going,which means you can
    not use the pump that came with the burner in most cases.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Westlake, Ohio
    Posts
    2,461
    If an oil line goes up 20 feet and then down 20 feet there is zero lift and has no affect on the pump. Overhead lines require 100% removal of air in the lines, the filter and the pump or you will lose prime. Easiest short term solution, run lines in concrete versus getting rid of air.
    captain CO

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,666
    Originally posted by Jim Davis
    If an oil line goes up 20 feet and then down 20 feet there is zero lift and has no affect on the pump.
    I don't think that is correct.
    That is true with a water circulator but not a fuel pump.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,803
    Originally posted by oil lp man
    Originally posted by Jim Davis
    If an oil line goes up 20 feet and then down 20 feet there is zero lift and has no affect on the pump.
    I don't think that is correct.
    That is true with a water circulator but not a fuel pump.
    Its true for oil too.

    BUT, you just added 40 foot to the lines length, and if the tanks 20 foot away, that comes out to I think 6" vacuum for 3/8", alittle high.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    NJ, Monmouth County
    Posts
    80
    The copper will corrode when it comes in contact with concrete. Some inspectors fail us for doing that around here...no matter how practical it may be.
    The More You Know, The More You Can Get In Trouble For!!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,666
    Originally posted by beenthere
    Originally posted by oil lp man
    Originally posted by Jim Davis
    If an oil line goes up 20 feet and then down 20 feet there is zero lift and has no affect on the pump.
    I don't think that is correct.
    That is true with a water circulator but not a fuel pump.
    Its true for oil too.

    BUT, you just added 40 foot to the lines length, and if the tanks 20 foot away, that comes out to I think 6" vacuum for 3/8", alittle high.
    A hot water system with a circulator is a closed system. So the ferris wheel works. ie no head loss(except friction loss) to lift the water 20 feet because of the water dropping the 20 feet back to the circulator. The momentum is similar to a ferris wheel.
    The oil is in an open system. The oil tank is vented. The pump has to lift the oil through the suction port. And if it is a two pipe system the oil is returned to the "vented" oil tank.
    The only way it would be a closed system is if there was a continuous loop of oil and oil was injected into a tee fitting with a check valve as it was burned off in the combustion chamber. But obviously there are simpler approaches to get the oil where it is needed.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,708
    Two for two..anyone else?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Westlake, Ohio
    Posts
    2,461
    If I wanted to siphon water out of a swimming pool that is four feet deep I run my hose to the bottom of the pool then up four feet and back to the ground and all the water run out. Other than the initial suction to fill the hose it takes care of itself with no lift. This is not a closed system. The amount of lift is the difference between the line going up and the line going down. If the line up is higher than there is some lift, but the difference of the two. That 2 strikes and two balls.
    captain CO

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,708
    You're headed to the bench.LOL.

    Now take that hose that is on the ground and bring it up another four feet,no just bring it up one foot from the ground and see what happens.






  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,803
    If you lift oil 20', and then have a 20' drop, you are still nuetralizing the lift, after you do the initial bleeding of the pump.


    But I agree with avoiding that type of install, because just alittle air can mess you up.
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