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Thread: Phosgene Gas

  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    394
    It is more likely HCL that Phosgene. Phosgene is carbonal chloride COCl2 and is formed from the reaction of carbon monixide with the chlorine. Wet chlorine gas (HCl) can cause chemical phnemonia.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2
    One tip I've found that helps to prevent residue gases burning off while brazing is leave your vacuum pump running on the system but just valved open enough to have a little negative pressure preventing refrigerant from burning off in your face. Also is good idea to have a nitrogen bleeding into the system at the same time closet to where your brazing and leave purging through while welding. This is not always possible if your working on a smaller system, but I do like the suggestion of using a shop vac to pull the fumes away as well as I suggest maybe a small fan to bring in fresh air pointed at your face. Hope this helps.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by dixie2005 View Post
    I find that I'm often exposed to phosgene gas when welding. There's usually residual gas in pipes when I'm servicing equipment that produces phosgene when heated. I'm wondering if anyone has any advice for me to help deal with this unpleasant and potentially harmful event? Do any of you guys use a mask?

    Thanks!
    One tip I've found that helps to prevent residue gases burning off while brazing is leave your vacuum pump running on the system but just valved open enough to have a little negative pressure preventing refrigerant from burning off in your face. Also is good idea to have a nitrogen bleeding into the system at the same time closet to where your brazing and leave purging through while welding. This is not always possible if your working on a smaller system, but I do like the suggestion of using a shop vac to pull the fumes away as well as I suggest maybe a small fan to bring in fresh air pointed at your face. Hope this helps.

  4. #30
    I've been a refrigeration mechanic for nearly 20 years. I have inhaled phosgene gas many more times than I care for. Even with thorough recovery practices. My question is: Has anybody ever heard of an HVAC-R tech losing their sense of smell due to phosgene gas inhalation. I've recently lost that sense and it has put a big damper on my career.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,642
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter DM View Post
    I've been a refrigeration mechanic for nearly 20 years. I have inhaled phosgene gas many more times than I care for. Even with thorough recovery practices. My question is: Has anybody ever heard of an HVAC-R tech losing their sense of smell due to phosgene gas inhalation. I've recently lost that sense and it has put a big damper on my career.

    go see a doctor and have it checked out, my father lost his many years ago and later found out it was a very early symptom of Parkinson disease.

  6. #32
    Thanks t527ed. I will do that. I used to use a halide leak detector a lot way back when, and now wonder if that is a possible cause.

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