Window Tint Inserts
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    31
    Does anyone make Tinted window _inserts_ that can be installed and removed as needed ?

    I have new double-pane windows, and the insides are perfectly flat with no interference from the grids (they are between the glass of course).

    I tried using tha that Gila Heat-Block film. My god what a nightmare this stuff is. Making matters worse is I have a couple of Golden Retrievers, and even if I did get the stuff in, it would inevitably get dog hair trapped between the film and glass during install.

    Yes, I shut down the fans and hvac, and vaccumed a few hours before attempts.

    After wasting an entire 18 foot rool trhing to do one pane of one window right, I gave up and took the rest back. At $40 a roll, I wasn't gonna keep going.

    I think the stuff is a racket myself LOL

    So, it would make sense to me that someone could make 1/8" or 1/16" thick treated plexi or other plastic that one could just slip into place in the summer. There's nothing to stop it from fiting right in the frame of each Window half.

    Does such a thing exist, or did I just give away a patent to someone

    -Larry

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    S.W. PA
    Posts
    3,298
    sounds like you just found a way to become a millionare

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    71
    Have you looked into solar screens??? Much better solution, IMO....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    71
    I recently priced DIY solar screens at Home Depot. The price was good and building the screens to fit looked pretty straighg foreward. I like the look of them as they cover the entire window.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    71
    That's exactly what I did.....saved over 50% by making them myself via Home Depot.....worth every penny!!! I don't understand why someone would chose tint over the screens?? Any opinions??

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    125

    Window films

    Window films should be applied to the exterior glass surface of double pane windows. By putting them on the inside surface you can overheat your glass as the tint absorbs solar load and heats the inner pane of glass and the airspace. It's OK to put the peel'n'stick tint films on the inside surface of single pane glass because you don't have the air space to deal with. Yes, they need to be washed carefully when the tint film is on the exterior, no different than when the film is on the interior pane anyway.

    Solar control starts when the architect puts pencil to paper- exterior shades, glass selections, etc. Dollars spent on better glass and solar control= smaller HVAC system and lower on-going energy costs.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    23
    I think it depends on where your home is. We had a professional install the 3M sSotchguard film on our home, because it is in a coastal area where hurricanes blow through occassionally. Besides the heat rejection and fade prevention, a huge benefit of the scotchguard film is that it is also hurricane-resistant and can take impacts up to 150 mph. With the Scotchguard film, we don't have to worry about boarding up the house in a hurricane warning situation. If we weren't in a coastal environement, we'd probably just have installed solar screens ourselves.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    I SURE would NOT bet MY life on some window film!

    Have you not seen 2x4 driven thru brick walls? do you REALLY think that a piece of 0.003" thick film will stop a flying board -- it might stop an insect, maybe even a humming bird --


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    31

    Re: Window films

    That's a damn fine point about the heat buildup. I never thought of that...

    -Larry


    Originally posted by gmcd
    Window films should be applied to the exterior glass surface of double pane windows. By putting them on the inside surface you can overheat your glass as the tint absorbs solar load and heats the inner pane of glass and the airspace. It's OK to put the peel'n'stick tint films on the inside surface of single pane glass because you don't have the air space to deal with. Yes, they need to be washed carefully when the tint film is on the exterior, no different than when the film is on the interior pane anyway.

    Solar control starts when the architect puts pencil to paper- exterior shades, glass selections, etc. Dollars spent on better glass and solar control= smaller HVAC system and lower on-going energy costs.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    31
    I'm going to look into this right after I'm done here.

    Thanks!

    -Larry

    Originally posted by robnjr
    Have you looked into solar screens??? Much better solution, IMO....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    956
    techlarry, gmcd made my point
    I work as a building operator and one of the buildings has the 3m installed on the inside. We replaced alot of windows, especially on the west side. it takes the highest sunload then the sun sets quick and there goes the window.

    oour window company told us the problem was the tint.

    3m guarantees for 1 year, he said it takes a couple for the windows to go

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    23
    cem-bsee,

    I didn't say I was betting my life on anything. Simply that the film offers hurricane protection. Anyone with common sense evacuates during a hurricane. Good grief...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    71
    I live in Texas and will be installing the solar screens this weekend. I just think they look much nicer and, like Robinjr, I don't understand why someone would prefer tint over screens. I orriginally thought about the window tint, but the heat build-up problem is something I had heard of before so that disuaded me. There is tint that can be aplied to the outside but, like Techlarry,I too prefer something that can be easily removed, like for the winter months.

    I understand the concept of tint helping (to a degree)in a huricane (or tornado). It is sorta like the safety glass in the windshield of your car. It will break and even blow out, but will reduce the shards of glass flying around the home. Wouldn't want to be there though.

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