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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    38
    I live a fairly newer house in the Chicago suburbs and the A/C seems to be running an awful lot to maintain the temperature in the house. Right now it is 94 degrees outside with a dew point of 56 degrees and the air conditioner has been running pretty much non-stop for the past hour. I have the thermostat set at 75 degrees and the house is comfortable, but I was just concerned at how much the unit was having to run. The unit is supposed to be a 3.5 ton carrier. I measure the temperature on the air coming out of the registers at it is 58 degrees. The house is a 2800 sq foot ranch style house. The living room, family, eating area and kitchen all have 11 to 15 foot high ceilings. The front of the house faces south and has about 45 sq feet of windows covered with both blinds and drapes that are currently closed. Does it seem normal for the unit to run like this given the conditions or should I have the unit checked to make sure it is working correctly?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    172
    Sounds real good, should be keeping the humidity down with thelong run times, that will only make it feel that much more comfortable. It sounds like you have a properly sized system aand these are rare Enjoy.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Inland Empire,CA
    Posts
    56
    3.5 tons for 2800 sqft is undersized. do you have 2 units or 1.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,240
    Gee, around here we have 3 to 3.5 ton units on 2800 sq ft all the time. They aren't undersized by Manual J standards, maybe by the ton per sq ft standard.

    75 and comfy in the kind of heat we're having sounds like a properly sized unit doing its job.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    956
    Originally posted by moe-air
    3.5 tons for 2800 sqft is undersized.
    maybe for cali

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,964
    Question: should I have a/c checked?

    Answers:

    NO, if you have an unlimited source of disposable income to apply to repair, replacement, or utility costs

    NO, if you just like living on the edge.

    NO, if you are into 3:00 a.m. 'surprises.'

    NO, if your last name is Lennox, Carrier, Bryant, York or Trane.

    NO, if being cool during the summer months is not a priority for you.

    NO, if not freezing in the winter is not a concern.

    YES, if you want to have the most efficiently operating system possible.

    YES, if you want the system to last as long as is reasonably possible.

    YES, if you don't get warm and fuzzy everytime you write a check to the local utility provider

    YES, if you like avoiding the 'unknown and unexpected.'

    YES, since most of us (even in the business) aren't direct decendents of the aforementioned corporate movers and shakers and have to pay for product or services.

    YES, since if you're like most of us you want to be comfortable in your home, year round.

    Moral: have a professional survey the system and make the necessary notations and/or recommendations for the maximum use and efficiency of your present and future systems. If that person is honest and straightforward with you and deals with you with a high level of respect and integrity, then reward that individual with the opportunity to make the necessary recommendations. If these meet with your approval, then allow the same individual to follow through.

    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  7. #7
    It's been in the mid 90's here a lot lately. My A/C runs from about 3pm until 11 or 12 at night non stop. In other words, perfectly!

    Does this site have a FAQ or sticky? Seems like you guys get a lot of questions on "It's 99 degrees out and my A/C can only manage 78 degrees" and "my A/C runs all day when it is really hot out". It could help people get the answers they need quickly, and less likely to blame you people for the perceived problem. I will admit I haven't snooped around much and this site might already have that. I know it has a search button, I've used it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    Doesn't sound like anythings wrong. 94 outside puts a load on that house.....expect it to run longer. Just be thankful you only require a 3.5 ton in that 2800 sq ft....sounds well insulated.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    I'm with John L ,on this one ,have it serviced once a year,slower times of the year are the best time to call.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Inland Empire,CA
    Posts
    56
    to operator.
    in cali, typical 2800 sqft tract home has 4 or more tons. my home is 2917 with a 5 ton bryant. previous home was 1711 with a 4 ton trane. newer homes have 2 units for each floor. co worker has 3066 sqft with a 3.5 and 3 ton unit.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    211
    The problem is your unit is very much undersized.
    My home here in Louisiana is only 1600 sq. ft and have a 3 ton.
    I would have installed you a 5 ton if I had did the install or at least try to convince you that your home required a 5 ton and let you make the call.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    38
    I was actually willing to pop for a 4 ton, but the builder insisted that the 3.5 was what the HVAC guy was recommending for our house. He said that the four ton wouldn't run enough to take the humditiy out of the house. This is our third summer living in the house, but I never noticed the A/C having to work so hard before. Then again last summer was a record cool summer and this summer has been the exact opposite. The average high temperature for Chicago in June is 82 degrees.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,240
    In our suburb, we have a common floorplan 3 bedroom 1800 sq ft ranch. We've installed 2, 2.5 and 3 tons of cooling on this exact same house. So which is right? Can you guys in Louisiana or California tell me? You told him his was wrong without seeing the house or knowing much about it.

    The answer is all of them are right. Anybody going by sq ft doesn't know what they are doing. The 2 ton homes are well shaded. The 2.5 ton homes aren't shaded but face north-south with no east-west windows. The 3 ton homes are east-west facing with no shade. Hmmm, all the same house, same sq ft with radically different cooling needs. Guess that's why the Manual J was invented.

    Do your California and Louisiana homes have the same insulation as his? Gee, you can't answer that - you don't know what he has yet you know his A/C is undersized. Well, my guess is he has R38 ceiling and R19 walls. That what they do in your area?

    Ricardo, if you are staying comfy in the extreme heat we've been having in the upper Midwest, your system is NOT undersized. hilton's 5 ton would have you running dehumdifiers all over the place in the normal humid 82 we typically have because it would be short cycling something fierce.

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