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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Citrus County, Florida
    Posts
    1,625
    the rear evaps have TXV's and a solenoid. The front evaps have orfice tubes, TXV's, Variable displacement compressors with control valves.

    Country Bumpkin, what year and model do you have? I have info for up to 2001 and can look it up for you.
    Last edited by Gunslinger; 03-30-2011 at 09:22 PM. Reason: typo
    Doug

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    So-Cal
    Posts
    585
    The rear evap have a solenoid to stop the refrigerant flow...

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    406
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunslinger View Post
    the rear evaps have TXV's and a solenoid. The front evaps have orfice tubes, TXV's, Variable displacement compressors with control valves.

    Country Bumpkin, what year and model do you have? I have info for up to 2001 and can look it up for you.
    I have a 1996 Chrysler Town And Country. It is the 3.8.


    Im like a mushroom, they keep me in the dark and feed me crap.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Citrus County, Florida
    Posts
    1,625
    Looks like it has an TXV for each evap. This is a complex system. You can buy the Mitchell CD on just this vehicle for about 30 bucks; then you'll have info on the whole vehicle
    Doug

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    4,564
    Quote Originally Posted by CountryBumpkin View Post
    I have a 1996 Chrysler Town And Country. It is the 3.8.
    I have the Dodge version of the same vehicle.

    Both evaps have TXVs and there is a liquid receiver to hold extra refrigerant near the radiator to compensate for varying conditions. There is no solinoid, the TXV just shuts almost completely when there is no load.

    There is an evaporator temperature sensor clipped to the front evap to cycle the compressor off if the evap gets near freezing. There is no low pressure cut out in these vehicles.

    There is a high side pressure transducer located near the alternator that tells the computer the high side pressure. When you first turn the system on the computer checks the high side pressure to make sure that it is high enough to indicate there is liquid in the system. If the high side is too low the computer assumes loss of charge and wont start the compressor. If it is in an acceptable range the compressor is started. As the high side rises, the fans are turned on at a low speed. If the pressure continues to increase, the fans go to high.

    once the system is running, the computer cycles the compressor based on the front evaporator temperature.

    remember, since evaporator temperature is based on suction pressure, both evaporators will run the same temperature regardless of differences in airflow.

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