Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    64
    I have a customer in an old house. She called it Victorian style. The old furnace has died, the chimney was condemned and a new one is not an option. Venting through the side wall looks like the only option at this time.
    The problem is that the space between the houses is a narrow paved sidewalk which excludes condensing furnaces because of ice buildup on the sidewalk at winter time.
    What products with side vent can I use as part of central air heating system?

    Thanks in advance for the help.

    gm
    gm10

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    North St Paul MN
    Posts
    858
    How was the chimney condemned? If you can run the PVC up the chimney, I don't see a problem with going with a 90% furnace. If the bricks are collapsed blocking any runs, you could just knock them out and use that chase to run the PVC.
    I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,910
    I think all 80%ers require a power venter to side wall vent them, so your stuck.

    No way to vent at the back of the house?

    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    64
    That was not actually a chimney. It was a B-vent not approved for outdoor applications. It was installed outside and is in bad shape now.
    The customer is selling the house and does not want any extra expenses.

    Regards,

    gm
    gm10

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    64
    Can't use front. Will ruin the look of the old house. Can't get to the back. Joists go wrong way. Finished basement was just renovated.
    I'd let this job go, but I was asked about it by a real estate agent. If I pull it somehow, I may get good leads in the future.

    Regards,

    gm
    gm10

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    North St Paul MN
    Posts
    858
    Originally posted by gm10
    The problem is that the space between the houses is a narrow paved sidewalk which excludes condensing furnaces because of ice buildup on the sidewalk at winter time.gm
    I re-read your post, and from your profile, I'm assuming that your in Toronto Canada. Most manufactors say that the venting for 90% furnaces should be 12 inch's above the average anticipated snowfall for that region, which would put your venting pretty high. I don't see how the condensation would be a big factor for icing up a sidewalk if it were placed high up.
    I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    CALIFORNIA
    Posts
    4
    A HEAT PUMP WILL DO

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    64
    According to the Gas Code, a vent should go 7 feet above the common driveway. Sidewalks is a grey area. Considering that this is a common sidewalk used by two houses, I can easily get in trouble if someone falls on that sidewalk. In case like that the contractor is always presumed guilty.
    The job is not worth the risk.

    gm
    gm10

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    North St Paul MN
    Posts
    858
    Originally posted by technoair
    A HEAT PUMP WILL DO
    In Canada???
    I'd rather have a bottle in front of me, than a frontal lobotomy.

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