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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5
    Irascible,
    This is true, but unfortunately this mentality apartment owners may have, is also seen in larger arenas. We have commercial and industrial systems releasing large amounts simply because of the cost incurred to facilitate a full repair is not budgeted in.
    You and I know that in the case of larger systems the loss of efficiency, reliability and internal damage to system components is usually higher than the actual repair to bring the unit back to normal operations.
    In these times of increasing competition every tool should be brought to the table.
    The right tool for the right job and the knowledge combined with common sense to choose which ones should be utilized and at what time.


    [Edited by deep vac on 06-26-2005 at 05:55 AM]

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    2,635
    I was thinking apartment units. But if you're dealing with leakers that have over 50 pounds of refrigerant then be careful. I'm sure I don't have to tell you that your personal license and wealth (not just your employer's) are in jeopardy if you're knowingly breaking EPA rules.

    Speaking of tools, this stuff here always impressed me more than Super Seal: http://www.ssrintl.com/ I don't know how Super Seal works. But the SSR supposedly reacts with moisture. To prevent internal clogs they have a procedure to deal with any moisture before you add the SSR. Super Seal just drops in without any prep. If Super Seal reacts with moisture as well then I could see how it would muck up contaminated systems.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,333
    i wouldnt use it

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5

    Hmm

    Irascible,
    The best way to remove moisture from a system is by mechanical action. Most drying agents just provide a masking characteristic and quite possibly will break down over time forming aggressive compounds causing future degradation of internal components.
    So far the most efficient tool is the liquid line dryer.
    I don't see enough liquid line dyers being utilized.
    The zeolite solid core design does an excellent job, and this way you can minimize the amount of chemical additives in the system if you truly want to dry up a system. Whether you use a sealant or not you should be cleaning up the refrigerant for the sake of extending the life and providing optimum performance.
    But in saying all this I still hold to “only refrigerant and oil in an operating refrigeration system”. As you all well know that some oils being used today require special attention to maintaining low moisture ppm.Another good reason to look at installing liquid line dryers on units which have undergone repair or simply do not have one.
    I like to use all conventional methods of repair first and then only after this has been totally exhausted then would I approach a refrigerant sealant.
    Ninety eight percent of the time convention repair methods are the answer.
    I don’t think that sealants should ever be used to bypass proven repair methods.Its a last resort!

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