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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1
    My 20 year old Bryant heat pump finally died (dead short in compressor) and I had the contractor who had serviced the unit for the past 15 years install a new Bryant Evolution unit (heat pump and fan coil). I got a few quotes from other contractors and my installer was not the lowest but in the ballpark. I had always found the contractor's service folks to be very professional and competent but the guys he sent to install the new unit were folks I had never seen before (and the kind of people you would not let in your house under most circumstances). A few of the little things the guys did during the install (types of supports used for the line set, not wet rags around downstream tubing during brazing, etc.) don't seem to be consistent with the unit's installation manual they left. Now, I'm worried that the unit wasn't installed correctly, particularly after numerous posts in this forum stress that installation is probably more important than the equipment. The unit has been operating (on heat) for a couple of days and seems to work but I have no way of knowing whether it is operating efficiently. Are there tests that qualified service personnel can perform to assess the adequacy of the installation? I'm paying cash for the unit and install and haven't yet paid or been asked to pay for that matter. I'd really appreciate advice before I fork over the thousands. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    406
    OJOE. I am going to print your post and turn it in to base. Just for shmits and giggles. But seriously. Just print your concerns out and send to contractor. It is that easy.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,841
    Originally posted by ohjoe
    My 20 year old Bryant heat pump finally died (dead short in compressor) and I had the contractor who had serviced the unit for the past 15 years install a new Bryant Evolution unit (heat pump and fan coil). I got a few quotes from other contractors and my installer was not the lowest but in the ballpark. I had always found the contractor's service folks to be very professional and competent but the guys he sent to install the new unit were folks I had never seen before (and the kind of people you would not let in your house under most circumstances). A few of the little things the guys did during the install (types of supports used for the line set, not wet rags around downstream tubing during brazing, etc.) don't seem to be consistent with the unit's installation manual they left. Now, I'm worried that the unit wasn't installed correctly, particularly after numerous posts in this forum stress that installation is probably more important than the equipment. The unit has been operating (on heat) for a couple of days and seems to work but I have no way of knowing whether it is operating efficiently. Are there tests that qualified service personnel can perform to assess the adequacy of the installation? I'm paying cash for the unit and install and haven't yet paid or been asked to pay for that matter. I'd really appreciate advice before I fork over the thousands. Thanks.

    Here we go again it is all about the installers,that put it in not the company.

    guys he sent to install the new unit were folks I had never seen before (and the kind of people you would not let in your house under most circumstances).



    And I bet they had only installed for a year inside joke sorry.Do not pay till he makes you happy to many companies hire guys like this to save money I bet these guys made less then $12 an hour & they didn't care about your job.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    DID THEY SPEAK E-N-G-L-I-S-H ?

    If not that $12.00 an hr just went down to $6.00

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    BTW if this contractor has given you 15 years of good reputable service, regardless of what his people look like, he is going to stand behind their work.

    The manufactures installation guide is that . It is a guide to a correct installation.
    Ill bet that you would really be concerned if you saw those guys reading the installation instructions step by step along the way.

    Welding line sets without a wet rag would not result in a bad installation, a wet rag is used when there are items in close proximity of the weld that would be damaged by the heat.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,875
    Originally posted by ct2


    Welding line sets without a wet rag would not result in a bad installation, a wet rag is used when there are items in close proximity of the weld that would be damaged by the heat.
    Like the service valves.
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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,875
    Ham&egger gave you the right advice.

    If a customer sent us a letter, or even called and voiced the concerns you have, we'd come out and check just to make sure, and put your mind at ease, weather you had payed us yet or not.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,841
    Originally posted by ct2
    BTW if this contractor has given you 15 years of good reputable service, regardless of what his people look like, he is going to stand behind their work.

    The manufactures installation guide is that . It is a guide to a correct installation.
    Ill bet that you would really be concerned if you saw those guys reading the installation instructions step by step along the way.

    Welding line sets without a wet rag would not result in a bad installation, a wet rag is used when there are items in close proximity of the weld that would be damaged by the heat.

    Ill bet that you would really be concerned if you saw those guys reading the installation instructions step by step along the way.

    Good point.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,157
    Beenthere

    Welding line sets without a wet rag would not result in a bad installation, a wet rag is used when there are items in close proximity of the weld that would be damaged by the heat.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Like the service valves.

    If you dont remove the cores--heat is hell on those 4-way valves also.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    83
    Ojoe,
    If your contractor did good work for you for 15 years, you should be able to have him stand behind the work of his employees.
    Bryant does offer an extended parts and labor warranty that can go out to 10 years, the pricing is really great and it would cover ALL SERVICE REPAIR PARTS AND LABOR FOR 10 YEARS(not the clean and checks). Just talk to the contractor.
    As far as a wet rag, it is one way to keep some of the parts(service valve, TXV, etc) from getting hot during the brazing. There are better products that can do the same. With the new Puron products it is important to do a clean brazing job. I and most quality contractors use nitrogen during our brazing to keep the inside of the pipes clean.

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