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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    71
    We did air duct cleaning for years.We used a biltmore truck and a Viper clean sweep.The kit (Viper) was pretty nice it came with everything needed, rods (rigid and flex) Reverse & forward balls and whips a hook for tight locations and hoses for dryer vent cleanings. We didnt sanitize at all, just do a very good job claening and there isnt a need for sanitizing. We also had Nadca Certification.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    292
    On average I sanitize about 1 system a year and then only at the homeowner's insistence. I was NADCA certified my first two years, but decided against it as most people have no clue who they are.
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing well at what others say can't be done at all!

  3. #29
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Posts
    70
    Quote Originally Posted by options View Post
    On average I sanitize about 1 system a year and then only at the homeowner's insistence. I was NADCA certified my first two years, but decided against it as most people have no clue who they are.
    I have been looking into NADCA everybody I have seen has said don't bother more for getting Govt. jobs. I am a certificate hoarder but at almost 1k kinda pricy.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    292
    I was certified for my first 2 years and they are an expensive joke! I think you'll also find the price to renew is far higher than that. They are also relatively small with only about 1000 member companies worldwide and few customers outside of the government know or care who they are.

    NADCA could do wonders for the industry, but need to set specific standards for cleaning that define what clean is and in my opinion include the mechanical portions of the air handling systems. They also need to create an equipment standard or at the very least a performance chart that shows the difference between equipment along with recommendations of where each type can be used.
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing well at what others say can't be done at all!

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193
    Quote Originally Posted by drk View Post
    http://www.abatement.com/air-duct/du...-power-rod.htm
    Reverse AIRE-SWEEP® Assembly: C320K (25’) & C335K (35’)
    Forward AIRE-SWEEP® Assembly: C310K
    http://www.abatement.com/air-duct/aire-sweep185gh.htm


    Just a start
    Have you personally used the AireSweep machine? Does it work good, better than the skipper balls?
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    292
    Don't waste your money! In my opinion and I've bought 3 different ones, there are no brush systems on the market that work anywhere near as well as pneumatic cleaning tools in conjunction with a good compressor and vacuum (minimum 5000 cfm).
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing well at what others say can't be done at all!

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193
    Have you used the air sweep brand in particular?
    What brand pneumatic are you using, and have you used their brushes systems?
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    292
    I've not used it.

    I have Nikro, Pro-Spin and had a third one that came with my first vac, but don't recall the brand. Brush systems have a lot of drawbacks: 1. They do not negotiate tight bends well. 2. They eat telecom & t-stat wires that have been run thru the duct work. 3. They rarely fit past wires and pipes in the wall cavities and panned returns. 4. When operating in reverse, if they get caught on something they will spin the brush off. I drilled and pinned my Nikro. I've also had both the rotating core and the solid core brush rods wrap themselves up when trying to use them without a helper. 5. Replacement brushes and rods are expensive.

    I have the Viper and Scorpion pneumatic cleaning systems. Both are excellent and the rods and tools are interchangeable. I prefer the longer 20' to 35' (1/4") rods that Heat Seal sells over the individual shorter 5' 1/4" rods and they are far cheaper than the shorter ones. I use these longer rods in the branch supplies and in shorter branch returns. For the longer branch returns and both mains I use 5' - 3/8" rods.

    I've found that the 14" - black rubber whips (3 or 4 tentacles) work best for normal cleaning of metal ducts. The 14" harder plastic whips (6 or 8 tentacles) are great for cleaning extremely dirty ducts, puffbacks, etc. The 28" harder plastic (8 tentacle) whips work great in fiberglass duct board and internally insulated metal ducts provided that this material has been installed properly and in good condition. The 28" low pressure whips (8 tentacles) work great in flex duct, but again the material has to have been properly installed and in good condition. If the inner plastic liner is torn, any tool you use will likely cause additional damage.

    When improperly installed flex duct often comes off the fittings and I highly suggest that you carry 36" to 48" wire ties and a tension tool to reattach them. To install these you will need to peel back the insulation and outer cover and then tape the inner plastic lining to the fitting. In conjunction with the tape, you can also use one or more zip screws with a washer to firmly attach the helix wire to the fittings. Use the wire ties and tension tool to securely fasten the outer cover and insulation over the inner liner to the fitting. Do your customers a favor and don't use duct tape! That stuff is absolute garbage. It will dry rot in a few short years and fall off. Foil tape is far better and not much more expensive if you buy it from the hvac distributors. All flex duct runs should be straight and as short as possible. Avoid sharp bends, hills and valleys as each will significantly reduce air flow.
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing well at what others say can't be done at all!

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193
    And what compressor are you using?
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    McDonald PA
    Posts
    292
    Champion 2 stage powered by the 56 HP diesel that runs my vac. Recommend buying the best compressor that you can afford, but definitely not the ones sold at Sears and other big box stores. You might try Eaton compressor. They are located in Eaton, OH and sell rather inexpensive chinese knockoffs. I know several duct cleaners that use them and I've not heard any complaints. I bought a 2 stage pump from them several years ago for a spare, but have never used it.

    http://www.eatoncompressor.com
    The greatest pleasure in life is doing well at what others say can't be done at all!

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by nchvac View Post
    And what compressor are you using?
    Quincy 370 set 250 psi

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    82
    I absolutely agree with Options. We have different brush systems, but they are used only in certain situations, and those situations are very rear.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193
    Quote--"have the Viper and Scorpion pneumatic cleaning systems. Both are excellent and the rods and tools are interchangeable. I prefer the longer 20' to 35' (1/4") rods that Heat Seal sells over the individual shorter 5' 1/4" rods and they are far cheaper than the shorter ones. I use these longer rods in the branch supplies and in shorter branch returns. For the longer branch returns and both mains I use 5' - 3/8" rods. "

    Can you elaborate a little on why you prefer the long rods for short runs and short rods for long runs?

    Also, I have seen where people use reverse skipper balls to pull a 3/8 flexible hose down a trunk line. Is anyone using this type of assembly?
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

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