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Thread: Dripping Coil

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Elgin Illinios
    Posts
    6
    I have a York 3ton ACthat is starting it's 13th summer. The coil is what I believe you whould call a slab type (not a a-coil) I have a problem in that it drips all over this inside the furnace (upflow).The water does not channel down between the fins to the drain channels. It started a couple years ago and I suspected that it could be dirt buildup. I secured the coil to the plenum and the plenum to the ceiling so that I could remove the furnace out of the way and get to the coil for cleaning.(Why do contractors install coils directly on top of the furnace so there is no way to even look let alone clean the coils?) It was dirty so I brushed the heavy junk off with a brush and purchsed a commercial grade foaming cleaner to wash and rinse the coil. Replaced furnace and ran unit. It helped but did not totally eliminate the dripping. This is the third summer and I have cleaned it again but still dripping.I have just installed a new furnace that is shorter. I extended the plenum down to the furnace temporaily with clear Lexan so they I can directly veiw inside while the unit is runnig. Other than this problem the unit cools and dehumidify the house well.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,320
    I'm not a big fan of in-place evap coil cleaning, but sometimes that's all that can be done. I rather favor having the evap pulled, sealed, and taken outside to be hit with coil cleaner and backflushed with water.

    If there's any buildup of crud or deposits on the coil fins, it can cause condensate to drip off rather than run to the drain pan. Other things to look for are adequate air flow...how clean is the blower wheel? If it's never been cleaned in 13 years, it's not putting out the same air flow as when it was new.
    • Electricity makes refrigeration happen.
    • Refrigeration makes the HVAC psychrometric process happen.
    • HVAC pyschrometrics is what makes indoor human comfort happen...IF the ducts AND the building envelope cooperate.


    A building is NOT beautiful unless it is also comfortable.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Elgin Illinios
    Posts
    6
    I clean the blower every year. This season the furnace/blower is new. The coil is squeaky clean. What I wonder about is the surface condition of the fins. Does these aluminum fins corrode-thus changing the surface tension? Kind of like a newly waxed car the water will bead up and roll off. The old oxidized car the water flattens out.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    178

    dripping coil

    if you have a new furnace and the coil is dripping on it and the coil is that old you should upgrade to a new a coil before you reduce the life of the heat exchanger in the furnace.you should be able to find some one to install the coil at a decent price if you do the finish work. By the sounds of it all you need is someone to pump down the condencer and cut and braze a new A coil in for you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Elgin Illinios
    Posts
    6
    Yes, that is my same thinking. The unit is 10seer and 13 years old. Should I just get all new system? Possibly upgrading to a 12seer.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    178

    dripping coil

    That would be the smart think to do it would pay for its self in the long run and that old system doesnt owe you anything

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