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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pacific Coast of Canada
    Posts
    4,008
    Originally posted by RoBoTeq
    Am I speaking a strange language here? Everything for a stove of freestanding fireplace are properly existing as is a properly lined and constructed chimney.

    What am I not relaying properly?
    Robin, that could be like me saying I know what I am doing installing a 5 ton heat pump to replace my oil furnace.
    Except the duct size is only good for 1200 cfm and the electrical is undersized.
    Was the chimney installed with a permit?
    Does it meet current building code?
    Were the liners set with high temperature fireclay or regular mortar?
    What is the clearance between the chimney and the exterior cladding?
    How much masonry surrounds the corbelled breeching going through the wall?
    Is the thimble stainless or galvanized?
    Do you have enough cold beer to debate me?
    Having said that I would recomend a nice EPA approved cast iron woodstove like a Vermont Castings or a Jotul that has a by-pass damper so you have the option of burning with the doors open.

    Hearthman: Up here 4" of brick equals no clearance reduction at all. 1" airspace gives you 50% reduction and the only way to get 66% is with sheet metal spaced out 1".



  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,962
    Originally posted by Collin
    Was the chimney installed with a permit?
    Does it meet current building code?
    Were the liners set with high temperature fireclay or regular mortar?
    What is the clearance between the chimney and the exterior cladding?
    How much masonry surrounds the corbelled breeching going through the wall?
    Is the thimble stainless or galvanized?
    Do you have enough cold beer to debate me?
    Having said that I would recomend a nice EPA approved cast iron woodstove like a Vermont Castings or a Jotul that has a by-pass damper so you have the option of burning with the doors open.

    Hearthman: Up here 4" of brick equals no clearance reduction at all. 1" airspace gives you 50% reduction and the only way to get 66% is with sheet metal spaced out 1".
    [/B]
    OK, I conceede I may be confusing with my info.

    This is a farmhouse in the middle of nowhere in Pennsyltucky. There are no permits, no building codes, no inspectors.

    However, I am qualified to know a well constructed chimney when I see one and this is a well constructed, and previously used, chimney.

    The owner of this house is a chicken farmer who has several farms he leases out. This guy is meticulous with his properties as you may tell from the pictures of this "over a century old" farmhouse that has been completely revamped on the outside. This chimney has obviously been built by someone very professional in this field, not a DIY project.

    The chimney has two clay tile liners, one for the oil furnace in the basement and the other for the fireplace. It is completely constructed of brick outside with concrete block to the clay (terra cotta) liners. The clearance from the liner to any combustionables is more then within any code I have ever seen. It has a nice, easy access cleanout on the outside. Have you looked at the pics of the chimney?

    I have absolutetly no worries whatsoever about the quality or safety factors of the hearth, back wall or surrounding area of where the stove is going to be put.

    There is no way I make enough money to have enough beer to debate you, so just keep telling me what I need

    I like the idea of the bypass damper option even though I prefer burning with glass doors closed. Like I stated before, downdraft is not going to be a problem with the way this chimney is built but I still like having something between me and the fire.

    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,962
    Wow! Something like this is exactly what I am looking for; http://www.jotulflame.com/oslo.html
    So Collin, how much additional equipment do I need to sell to be able to buy one of these things?
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pacific Coast of Canada
    Posts
    4,008

    Talking Lots.

    The Jotul is a nice stove, but since it has both a front and side loading door you will need 18" hearth clearance on the floor in front of both doors. The othe side requires 6" The previous link you showed with the 2100 millenium by Quadrafire is a real nice quality stove that burns great also.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,962
    Well, I have the clearances with the hearth. I will post pictures of the inside when we take possesion of the house. Since we need to buy a refrigerator, washer, dryer and lawn mower, the stove is being put on the "back burner".

    Besides, we certainly won't be needing heat for a couple of months.

    I also really like the idea of the side loading door. That stove has the option of a full cooktop as well. I have a real thing for utilizing a wood stove for as much as I can in the winter. I used to keep a pot of water steaming at all times on the last one I had. Made for a great humidifier as well as hot chocolate or tea anytime. With that property I had lots of trees to cut up for firewood. I will be needing to buy wood for this place.

    When these stoves say they are "multifuel", what do they mean? I am thinking they burn wood, coal and maybe peat since they are built in the UK. Or are they gas and wood?
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pacific Coast of Canada
    Posts
    4,008
    Generally, wood only.
    Stoves that burn coal need shaker grates and I have not heard of any stove that burns gas and wood.


    [Edited by Collin on 06-12-2005 at 01:30 PM]

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Lisle,Illinois
    Posts
    526

    Cool

    I may have missed something here but Robo did you not say that your clay liner was 6"?Pardon my apparent ignorance but I thought 6" required an engineered metal chimney with an approved flue collar of six inch ID.
    Ethics are as important as education.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    724

    Wink Combustion AIr

    Robin, No matter which way you go, just remember to "Open A Window" each time you lite the fire!

    Good Luck. How are you feeling? Has your Doctor released you to carry all the wood?

    The quality of my performance, sometimes depends on the quality of my audience.
    Imitation (Plagiarism) is the best compliment one can get -- "Open A Window"

    To improve Indoor Air Quality: Control Indoor Air QUANTITY = "I.A.Q.Q."

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,962
    I know about the need for combustion air, thanks for the reminder though.

    I am for the most part back to normal if not better health wise. However, I did do severe damage to my heart and will never have the same stamina. I got cocky from walking a couple of miles a night while in Cayman and decided to go for a long walk while I was in Havana. Well, the beach in Cayman that I walked each night is flat. Havan is built on a hillside. I just about wiped myself out walking up those hills.

    Likewise, I still have the strength to lift but I get winded very quickly from any upper body work. Carrying wood and mowing the lawn at the new place should get me into better shape though.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


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