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  1. #1
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    I have an ongoing argument with my boss about reading the gauges. I say the green scale for R22 tells me the saturation temp. of the refrigerant. He says it is the actual temperature of the freon in the suction line. I say no it is the temperature at which the freon saturates at the corresponding pressure. Pressure temperature relationship. Ok.. he tells me he as two years of AC college and I can't convince him different. He still maintains it is the temperature of the freon. AM I not understanding this or what??

  2. #2
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    To make this argument quick and easy, go to your gauges and look at the 100 lb mark. You will see that 100 is about 60* for R-22 on both sides.

    Your gauges do not measure saturated temperature.

    That is done by using formulas on subcooling and superheat. Such as subcooling + refrigerant temperature = saturated temperature of liquid line. Superheat + refrigerant temperature = saturated temperature of suction line.

    If you need proof... I think I can find an old link somewhere that you can print from RSES.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Unfortunately the boss is always right... even when he's wrong. The green scale is the saturation temperature (boiling temperature) at sea level. The thermomter tells what the actual refrigerant temperature is.

    The saturation temperature is the temperature at a given pressure in which refrigerant temperature will not rise any more without changing states (IE from liquid to vapor). Lusker meant to say Subcooling = saturated temperature - refrigerant temperature, and Superheat = refrigerant temperature - saturated temperature.

    [Edited by sadlier on 06-11-2005 at 11:52 AM]

  4. #4
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    Originally posted by sadlier
    Unfortunately the boss is always right... even when he's wrong. The green scale is the saturation temperature (boiling temperature) at sea level.

    Saturation temp at that pressure in psig.

    [Edited by sadlier on 06-11-2005 at 11:52 AM]
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  5. #5
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    sadlier

    Look at your equation and look at mine. They both say the same thing.

    You are looking for subcooling and superheat. Reverse your equation and I am looking for saturated temperatures.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    I agree with you woodman. the pressure on the low side gauge corrospondes with the saturated refrigerant temp in the evap coil. the pressure temp relationship only exists at saturation which occurs in either coil, not the suction line.in the suction line the temp would be greater as you would have added super heat. the scale on the gauges is the same as the scale on a pt chart, they are just useing the most popular gases and saving you from having to pull out the chart

    [Edited by phosgene on 06-11-2005 at 12:19 PM]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    There is only one problem with my perfectly logical post.

    You can't find superheat or subcooling unless you have a saturated temperature value, so that would make the PT chart or gauge chart your saturated temperature wouldn't it.

    OK... just call me a dumb a$$.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Texas
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    saturation temp

    this is what I am trying to say, that the gauges don't tell you the temperature, they give the given temp. of the refrigerant when it changes state,(from liquid to vapor or vise versa) at a given pressure. Am I correct in saying it is the boiling point of the refrigerant at a given temp. Example.. suction pressure on r22 at 55psi would mean about 30 or 32 temp the refrigerant will begin to boil. Which is not saying the refrigerant is 32 degrees. And this is my agrument with him, when I was charging a unit he said the refregerant in the suction line where my gauge is reading 55 the r22 in that line is 32 degrees. Which I believe is wrong. The actual temp. of the line say is 42 - 32 equal 10 degrees of superheat. It is 10 above the saturation point at this pressure. I believe this is a fundemental law of Physics. Now either I am wrong or he is..

  9. #9
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    Jan 2004
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    Lusker,

    Are you doing you company paper work, and posting here at the same time.

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  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Originally posted by beenthere
    Lusker,

    Are you doing you company paper work, and posting here at the same time.

    shut up

    so are you....

  11. #11
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    Aug 2004
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    I just read your post lusker and I appreciate your input..post 1393 makes simple since doesn't it.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Re: saturation temp

    Originally posted by thewoodman
    this is what I am trying to say, that the gauges don't tell you the temperature, they give the given temp. of the refrigerant when it changes state,(from liquid to vapor or vise versa) at a given pressure. Am I correct in saying it is the boiling point of the refrigerant at a given temp.



    It is the temp at which it will change state either from a lquid to vapor, or vise versa. Depending if your reading saturated vapor or liquid.




    Example.. suction pressure on r22 at 55psi would mean about 30 or 32 temp the refrigerant will begin to boil. Which is not saying the refrigerant is 32 degrees. And this is my agrument with him, when I was charging a unit he said the refregerant in the suction line where my gauge is reading 55 the r22 in that line is 32 degrees. Which I believe is wrong. The actual temp. of the line say is 42 - 32 equal 10 degrees of superheat. It is 10 above the saturation point at this pressure. I believe this is a fundemental law of Physics. Now either I am wrong or he is..
    You would be right that the line temp would be higher.




    Show this post to your boss, and let him give his reply.

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  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Woodman want some REAL GOOD advice? Go to your boss and apologize for disagreeing with him. Tell him he is right and you are wrong. Tell him you feel like a complete moron.

    If you tell him he is wrong YOU LOSE!
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

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