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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2

    Frown

    I have purchased a new house from a builder. The house came with a 4 tonne York A/C unit with a variable speed furnace. It simply can't cool the house. Outside temp is 24C, and I can't get the inside below 23C. This is odd, because the 4 tonne is actually oversized from the 3 tonne that the builder recommended. One person I've had a look a the system says it was installed wrong. First, note that the compressor is located about 85 feet from the furnace. I've been told that in this situation, my system should be equipped with (1) a TX valve, instead of a piston (whatever that is), (2) a solenoid valve, (3) a receiver located outside with the compressor, (4) rigid lines, (5) 1 and 1/8 inch gas line, and (6) half inch liquid line. My system has none of these, as far as I can tell anyway. I do note that the lines used are flexible and only measure 7/8 inch (gas) and 3/8 inch (liquid). I don't know what a TX valve, solenoid valve or a receiver is. Can someone help me? What are these things being recommended to me? Do these recommendations make sense. If I proceed, it's going to be costly, so I want to make sure. The builder won't pay for any of it, as it was my idea to relocate the A/C away from the furnace. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    483
    Might be a lot cheaper and better to move the condensing unit closer to the indoor unit if possible.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,955
    The builder may have built the house, but chances are another contractor (hvac) installed this system. That being the case, I would involve them. Regardless of what you 'requested,' i.e. locating the condensing unit a distance from the indoor, the contractor should have either a) refused to relocate the unit, or b) made the necessary modifications so the unit would operate properly. A quality contractor should stand behind his work, and if he chose to do the system in this manner, then he needs to at least meet you halfway in solving the problem and dealing with the respective costs.
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    340
    Originally posted by caber
    I...the 4 tonne is actually oversized from the 3 tonne that the builder recommended.
    Why did the HVAC contractor install an oversized system? That's a recipe for higher electric bills, and clammy, uncomfortable cooling with poor humidity control. What did the heat gain calculation for your home say the size should be?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2
    The home was speced for a 3 and 1/2 tonne. I wanted a four tonned as I had ordered a bunch of extra heat producing items (halogen lights, etc...). It would be much easier to move the unit, but I don't want it in the location near the furnace as it will block the walkway to the backyard. I guess all I really need to know is whether these recommendations make any sense to anyone. Will they make a difference? Thanks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    340
    It is very hard for us to diagnose an insufficient cooling problem like this over the 'net.

    The previous recommendation to call the original installer back is the right one. Have them diagnose the problem and make the appropriate modifications, if necessary. You've already paid them to install it correctly, why pay someone else to fix it?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    #3 and ,may not be needed.Without seeing the mfrs,specs,for a long lieste,I'd say the rest sound like what the specs may be.


    Post the model numbers and maybe someone will check the mfrs. specs for you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,759
    You should have the factory txv, their balance port, so their non bleed. So you don't need a seleniod valve.

    York doesn't recommemd receivers on 85' line sets, its not that long.

    Need the mod numbers of the unit to tell you about the line set size.

    As far as rigid copper, if they took their time, and kept the soft copper as straight as possible, it should be ok.

    Forget it, we know it looks like a roller coaster.

    If your builders hvac contractor has any questions on the lines, tell them to make a drawing of how the lines run, and fax it to York. York will tell them what size it needs to be, and if it needs a trap, or anything else special.

    Thats what we don when we have to run excessive line lengths.

    We have some that are 140' on York equipment, and no receivers, as per York.

    [Edited by beenthere on 06-07-2005 at 05:37 PM]
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