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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold.calm
    Posts
    6,358
    Originally posted by mightycpa
    OK, so far so good, so if I see the oil residue, which leak am I seeing? The freon coming back in to the compressor, or the freon leaving the compressor?

    I guess seeing the liquid leak doesn't mean I'm not leaking the gas too.

    Tx,

    George
    It doesn’t matter to or from. If there is oil on any joints then there is a 99.9% chance that it’s leaking freon.

    Any good mechanic will clean up oil stains when repairs are made. As a HO you can do this yourself. Fantastic / Windex / 409 etc.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,285
    Originally posted by mightycpa
    OK, so far so good, so if I see the oil residue, which leak am I seeing? The freon coming back in to the compressor, or the freon leaving the compressor?

    I guess seeing the liquid leak doesn't mean I'm not leaking the gas too.

    Tx,

    George
    George, Again, with all things being equal, if you see oil at a joint or exposed tubing somewhere there could be a leak and it is on the high side where the liquid is. The liquid is the high pressure side that comes out of the compressor. The low side is the large line that returns refrigerant to the compressor. The compressor takes low pressure gas and pressurizes it, the metering device at the evap coil reduces it to low pressure and the compressor sucks it back again. Never ending circle..

    Of course you realize that was a very simple-simple description.


    I hope this helped

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    18

    Lightbulb

    Ding! Too bad there's not an icon for a hammer hitting my head.

    You mean the "liquid line", of course.

    And I take the point that if there's a leak, then there's a leak, and it don't much matter where it comes from, unless I guess, you're the guy fixing it.

    Thanks.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,285
    Originally posted by mightycpa
    Ding! Too bad there's not an icon for a hammer hitting my head.

    You mean the "liquid line", of course.

    And I take the point that if there's a leak, then there's a leak, and it don't much matter where it comes from, unless I guess, you're the guy fixing it.

    Thanks.


    >>>>>>http://www.my-smileys.de/smileys2/49_4.gif<<<<<


    just use the [img]what ever [/url] tags and you are good to knock yourself out

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    go back to the basics --

    how do you know that there is a leak?

    Is anyone using the superheat method of charging?
    Have the coils been cleaned?


  6. #19
    Originally posted by cem-bsee
    go back to the basics --

    how do you know that there is a leak?

    Is anyone using the superheat method of charging?
    Have the coils been cleaned?

    Ding, ding! I'm surprised nobody else read that page in the hacker detection handbook... Typical answer from a hack when a unit isn't working right: "It was low on freezone, I added some".

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