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  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    368
    Sure hope you have a mechanical inspection before any of that gets covered. Believe your on the IRC there. The flex, per mfg. installation instructions is to be supported every 4'. Its also to be 1 1/2" wide on the supports. Now wwhen its in the rafter span roofing nails WILL penetrate the vapor barrier. Its already crushing the flex where the drive cleats are being used as supports. Can't read the R Value on it in the pic but my IRC says that in the rafter span it needs to be a minimum of R-8. As far as runing across the floor it does look like a window seat was planned. If not have em move it. Get it inspected, sit down with the builder, but by all means call your attorney for advise before hand.
    Vern P: 2003 MBC,MRC,IFGC,IFC
    An HVAC-Talk Michigan Chapter Mechanical Inspector, Jurisdiction-Ann Arbor

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    There's likely no other way to run the ducts,without dropping the ceiling,or going across the floor.the builder may have insisted it be run in this manor.

    Without knowing a Man J and D was done,it could be okay.


    The flex will not get depressed that much by drwll,but it's a very hot spot to run it.I'd ask to to see hat can be done to improve it.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    in a house, Appomattox, Va.
    Posts
    3,293
    Looks like they knocked out a few of the knee wall studs. Those are structural and the wall may need some more framing added to allow for the missind studs.

    Do those ducts run all the way across the floor to other side of house ordo they drop through in the middle? If they go all the way across they MIGHT be able to run between floor joists. Can't run two in one space though, so if they both feed down won't happen.
    Col 3:23


    questions asked, answers received, ignorance abated

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    102
    Hmmm, looks like floor joists run perpendicular to the duct travel, thus, cant run between them. If no other way, I think I would prefer a furr-down equally spaced in the room for each of hte ducts, there is some room in the peak, where the ceiling will be flat.

    Personal preference, I would insist on elimination of all the flex. Just my opinion of flex.

    Regards

    David Graves

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,868
    Originally posted by dash
    There's likely no other way to run the ducts,without dropping the ceiling,or going across the floor.the builder may have insisted it be run in this manor.

    Without knowing a Man J and D was done,it could be okay.


    The flex will not get depressed that much by drwll,but it's a very hot spot to run it.I'd ask to to see hat can be done to improve it.
    I am surprized in the fact that this is all you have to say about this system Dash. Even if there was no other way to run them look at the flex in the bottom picture that takes off to the left and tell me that looks OK. On both sides the sheeting on the roof could have been cut and both flex ducts run tight against the wall rather than the way its done now.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Do you mean the flex elbow to the left or what looks unsuported running over it?

    Maybe I was to easy on this one,but really just trying to say the builder often refuses space ,and the HVAC guy gets the blame.

    We know we have VS air handler,but we don't know the sizes needed,or the lengths of any of the runs.


    Try to talk with both of them to improve the job!

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    2,868
    Looks like a flex P Trap to me.

  8. #21
    This is a modular home. Mistake #1. Many times you are very limited to what you have to work with. The house is dumped off and the field installers are left to make it work. There have been many instances that we have had to make compromises to our work, because it is a modular. Now I'm not saying the install looks great. There are many things we would of done differently from your limited photos.
    It looks like you will have to have some form of ducting under your window if the floor joists go the wrong way. Often times modulars have flush beams that eliminate duct in floor joists.
    The flex up the rafters should be changed. We would use rectagular insulated duct, Then have a styrofoam above that with a small air space. Hope this helps.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    7
    Thanks for the quick responses. More images and the Right-J load calculation. Middle photo shows begining of run - I assume that is where the air handler will be located.




  10. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,273

    Question Manual J

    Originally posted by whynot
    More images and the Right-J load calculation.

    46,079 BTUh TOTAL Load for 3,911 Square Feet looks more like total of 5.0 Tons to me. Did I miss something?

    Carrier model FK4 DNB 00600 AAAA was selected.
    Sensible load capacity is _______ BTUh
    along with another unit of _______ BTUh ?


    [Edited by dan sw fl on 05-31-2005 at 06:26 AM]
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  11. #24
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    102
    Some poor tech will have fun installing that air handler. Better yet, the tech who has to come back out and service it later.

    As was mentioned earlier, that crap need to be ripped out use rectangular betweent the rafters instead.


    Regards



    [Edited by biscuitnt on 05-31-2005 at 07:49 AM]

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    125
    Are you gonna pay the diffrence in price between the flex or hard duct?

    Or is that up to the homeowner?
    Any more great suggestions?

  13. #26
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    102
    bbk,

    To answer your question, No, I am not going to pay the price difference between the flex and hard-duct.

    The homeowner certainly will, either now or later on; but he will pay; and if later on, he will pay dearly!

    As for other "great suggestions" , I dont have any more at this time, but stick around and I am sure something will come to mind.

    Regards

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