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  1. #1
    Atlanta area, 3 zone residence about 1200 sq ft per zone. Before we bought the house the upstairs was remodeled and a couple of flexible ducts were added to the new areas. It appears that this was done pretty much randomly. As a result, we have very un-even heat/cool. That is parts of the house are colder/warmer than others depending on the season of course.

    I have had two HVAC guys eyeball the system and both came away with the "you need to replace the entire system" philosophy. Both downstairs units are similar vintage and both operate very well so I am not willing to buy this theory.

    Are there sources for "balancing" residential units like this, maybe a more "professional" duct installation at a reasonable cost?

    Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.
    JB

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Call HVAC contractors ,tell them you want a Manual J ,load calculation,to determine correct size and proper cfm for each room.And you want a Manual D duct size calculation to size the duct properly for each room.

    If they can't or won't do it, keep calling,don't waste your time or theirs.

    Try http://www.acca.org for contractors

    or http://www.nationalcomfortinsitute.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    9
    too many unanswered questions....

    three separate systems, or one system employing three zones?
    maybe two systems, one standalone and one handling two areas?

    Each has to be approached differently.

  4. #4
    Sorry, my ignorance of the terminology is showing.

    I have a 2 story home with a finished basement. Each floor has it's own separate unit-I call them zones. Only the unit in the attic that operates the upstairs is not doing the job properly. It is clear to me that the re-modelor did little other than put in a couple of extra duct and vents and call it done. I believe that the unit is entirely capable of doing the job but the duct additions are affecting the balance-just looking for a local HVAC person willing to take on a small job.

    I have contacted someone referred from the ACCA website and will get an estimate next week.

    Thanks.

    JBoggs

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Check the model numbers,if they are all the same size ,the top floor ,with the attic has the highest heatgain,it may need to be larger as well.Or add some insulation to the attic,remodeling it could have been moved ,might want to look above the ceilings in the problem rooms.

  6. #6

    I am sure that will help

    It does need some more insulation, I agree. It just seems that plenty of air comes out of some vents, others hardly any-with the vents wide open. One other symptom, the return in the master bedroom is very noisy, obviously pulling a lot of air (it's also the closest to the unit, so I am sure that contributes), but some of the other returns don't seem to be moving much air at all. It could be that the unit is undersized-2 ton for about 1200 ft if that tells you anything.


    JB

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    9
    Hello boogins,

    Without seeing the situation, a number of possibilties exist that would explain the complaints you have.

    Remodelers, who often do small duct jobs themselves in additions they've built, sometimes do some pretty dumb things with duct...like take one undersized pipe (say 6"), run it 20' from trunk and put a tee on the end to split to two registers. Never work right for a variety of reasons, but for the remodeler it's cheaper to do it himself and puts more money in his own pocket than calling in HVAC professional.

    ...Trunk may not be sized to handle more branch pipes
    ...new branch(es) may be undersized
    ...unit may not be capable of adequately heating/cooling more area
    ...new piping may not be insulated, or properly insulated
    ...there are a variety of other reasons, but a realiable and honest HVAC pro will fix your problems the best way possible.

    The noisy R/A is apparently not insulated for sound (sometimes they just can't be due to limited areas). being close to blower usually means more noise. Under normal circumstances, most R/A grilles may seem to not be doing much. They don't "suck" as hard as most homeowners seem to think they should, but not necessary that they should, as static is lower than supply.

    2 ton for 1200 ft. is doable if all things (insulation, tightness, quality installation) are up to snuff. Is that 1200 feet before or after the remodel?

  8. #8

    Thanks all for courteous and detailed replies

    It's about 1200 ft after the remodel. The footprint of the overall space was not increased but the master bath was re-configured within it's original space. There is blown-in insulation in the attic but the re-modeler has also added some roll insulation betweent the joists, I guess they had to re-do the ceiling to change the room. When they ran the ductwork to the new space, they used flexible duct material and it is a smaller size than the original rigid ductwork.

    The master bath is alway cold in the winter. The master bedroom is fine albeit the return is noisy. Down the hall my one sons room is always cold in the winter, warm in the summer but his brothers room directly across is about right. The playroom at the end of the hall is hot in summer, cold in winter.

    I have a certified company coming on Thurs, we'll see what they have as a solution.

    Thanks.

    JB

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