Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 14 to 26 of 68
  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,091
    In the south, we put our air handlers in the hall on a platform with the return air grille underneath. We put the uv under the platform shining on the underside of the coil, it makes a really nice nightlight. And if I put a uv on the north side of my house I don't have to pressure wash.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    43

    Not the end all but..

    If you are able to keep the coil lit completely on a clean(new) coil it will not grow anything which can keep you at maximum efficiency and people like to. have nothing growing onthe air handler in their home. blue tube is the one i install the most of and they seem to last. I have had a high failure rate with honeywell uv. JMHO

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Georgia
    Posts
    66
    A while back i atteneded the green seminar in Atlant. I talked to the direct maker of these products. He said they kill bacteria and spores which is great and also reduce smells and odors. So yes in a senese they are worth the money if your having a problem with that sort of stuff, but here is the catch. These uv lights do not and are not intended to kill a large volume of pollutents. So if you have your whole family smoking in the house you will still smell smoke, if you have a huge mold problem you will still get sick. In my opionion they will work if you have a smoke every now and again in your household, or anything else equivalent to that quanity.
    No eye has seen, no ear has heard, no mind has conceived of what the Lord God has prepared for those who LOVE HIM!!!!!!!!! .J.I.L.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Middlesboro, KY
    Posts
    1
    UV units work but you must get a unit that is high output so that the exposure time needed in a standard forced air unit is short enough to sterilize the cells. I also think that the unit should be placed 12-14" away from your coil as it will not allow growth and not only will your air be cleaner but you will find that your unit works better because it is in "like new" condition. Our lamps usually take about 120 days to completely clean a coil with no chemicals and we have seen results in units with up to 6" thick coils.

    As for the amount of sterilization one of these units will produce, it depends on several factors: size of coil, size of duct, air velocity, temperature, etc. BUT... on a standard residential unit with less than 5 sf of coil surface and a home of about 2500sf, we have seen as much as 92% reduction in bioaerosols each air exchange. A home of this size you typically have about 4-5 air exchanges per hour so you do the math and it is easy to see that there is real potential for this product to work.

    In terms of the tempurature of the air and it causing the bulb to not work right, make sure that you get a quality bulb that has a high enough burn temperature to be effective. Ideal temp for UVGI is about 87 degrees at the bulb surface.

    UV technology has been around for decades and actually won a nobel peace prize in 1903 for fighting tuberculosis, so it is proven technology you just have to make sure that you get a unit that is quality.

    Hope this helps someone.

    Thanks!

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    907
    It seems to me that if you used a good air filter (> MERV 11 without leaks around it) from the start you wouldn't need a UV lamp to "clean" the coil. Filters are much cheaper too, if you use standard industry sizes instead of the rip-off odd sizes used by residential HVAC "whole house cleaners" to chain you to their overpriced refills. I had quite a chuckle when I saw HOs complaining on Amazon that some standard industry 4" filters were "not full size". HOs have been conditioned (no pun intended) to expect 4"3/8 and other silly sizes like that. It was like "Hey, you're supposed to rob me!"
    -If you won't turn it on then nothing else matters.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    Bottom line on IAQ Stuff
    • UV....No consensus...I am a skeptic about most of the installs that I see. UV on coil is OK as UV kills stuff that is not moving. Dead mold spores are still allergens.
    • Ozone generators....Smoke and mirrors.
    • High Merv filters...Good IF the system fan can stand the increased static pressure...Rare without modifications.
    • 1 inch pleated filters...Good for IAQ...Bad for the equipment and cost of operation...Almost always...unless the ductwork is modified...But then High Merv filters make more sense.
    • Electronic filters....Good IF maintained correctly (Hard to know).
    • Duct Cleaning......Seldom worth the cost, but clean is better than dirty. More likely to benefit occupants with alergies.
    • Duct Sanitizing....Only with EPA certified products. Smoke and mirrors...mostly.
    IMHO
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    San Antonio, Tx
    Posts
    43
    I only read part of the posts, but in a recent seminar, we were told the UV only works for a couple of feet, and only effective on air that it directly contacts.
    So in his words, they were pretty useless. I do like the American Standard 24 v electronic air cleaner

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,451
    Fresh air ventilation is the most important component of indoor air quality. An air change in 4-5 hours is needed to purge indoor air pollutants and renew oxygen.
    Second is avoiding more than 24 hours of continuous dampness. This prevents growing biologicals that produce pollutants that many people react to.
    Third is removing particulate from the air that contaminates the equipment and may contain biologicals and equipment pluging dirt.
    Fourth is anything you may choose to deal with particular problems you may have.

    Remember any well filtered air stream flowing over a moisture removing cooling coil is washed by the condensate flowing down the drain.
    On cold windy days most homes get enough fresh air,like an air change in 4-5 hours. On calm days with moderate temperatures, most home do get enough fresh air, less than an air change in 12-24 hours. There are not enough UV lites in the world to make that home have good indoor quality.
    Have fun!
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  9. #22
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Browns Point, WA
    Posts
    11
    Unless you are installing UV lights in a hospital or dentists office, I think they are just a waste of money..I think a good filter does a much better job.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    311
    We have a customer that has two Trane AHU's in the attic with "Guardian" Uv 's. Were installed two years ago. Both stopped working, and one tech had new bulbs ordered. I went out to put them in and BOTH would not work. Replaced the 12 volt corded PS's and got one to light up. Opened up the "power head" of the second one and found burned component on the circuit board. We are losing money on the situation and the HO is not happy at all. The Guardian seem to be cheesy, all plastic and way overpriced. Anyone recommend a better light for the money?
    G T T

    “In the end we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends”

    Martin Luther King, Jr.

  11. #24

    Air Knight

    Been running an Air Knight for a couple of weeks and seems to be working well... I think the Air Knight has different transformer requirements.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    43
    The ones we install are made by blue tube and i am told they warranty everything but the bulb for lifetime. I have warrantied out hundreds of honeywell uv lights due to ballast failure.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    311
    Several years ago I ran across a cheap fl fixture with a germicidal uv fl tube in it, and sitting in the airstream in a residential system. The fixture was about $20 , and the tube $35. I copied the set up and put one in my house! Concern would be if the ballast burned up, would put nasty smoke thruout the house, eh?
    G T T

    “In the end we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends”

    Martin Luther King, Jr.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event