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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    33
    The sanuvox has an air diffuser that slows down the air around the bulb.

  2. #41
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Lubbock Texas
    Posts
    769
    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyfan628 View Post
    I have done air quality tests before and after uv installation. With the sanuvox 3500 and it does exactly what it claims by removing voc's
    You are actually reducing the contaminate that is causing the VOCs. Mold spores off gas VOCs when they are consuming substrate. UVGI lighting is in capable of VOC reductions by themselves. Your lamp manufacture might be over marketing the capabilities of the lamps.
    The premise of ventilation is that the OA is clean or of sufficient quality to be used for dilution. Traditional ventilation is somewhat being threatened by the fact that the EPA is changing the requirements for outdoor air quality which is creating non-attainment zones in what is now becoming a significant portion of the country. That means that buildings in those areas will need to clean up the OA before they bring it into the building.
    www.genesisair.com
    Genesis Air Inc.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    33
    I performed an air advice test before and after the install. The results were very impressive.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Chesterfield, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    84
    Quote Originally Posted by cowboyfan628 View Post
    The sanuvox has an air diffuser that slows down the air around the bulb.
    Plus the bulbs and the units are warranted for three years. The replacement bulbs are also covered for three years.

  5. #44
    In my opinion, UV bulbs have one purpose only: that is too prevent mold growth on the evap. coil. Now, that is a double edged sword, because U.V, light is a destructive force. It eats away at just about every material known to man over time. Plastics, are especially susceptible to this phenomenon.

    I run my business in SoCal. The climate is arid and dry. Mold is a non-issue. I do not install U.V. lights, period. I rip them out when the customer approves. They cause drain pans to "live" maybe 3-5 years if they were put inside the coil. They eat flex duct in as little as 2 years. This causes issues down the road when the customer is angry that their 4 year old drain pan caused a water damage in their hallway. They provide no real benefit that a good pleated filter can't take care of. If I lived in a high humidity area, my position might be different. But again, only if there are mold issues on the coil.

    Electronic air cleaners, such as the Honeywell types we see everywhere, are equally as worthless. They let through so much debris its laughable to even call it filtration. Hmmm......why is my coil freezing up? Why is my superheat low? I get excited when I see these installed, because a coil cleaning isn't too far away.

    And then there's the guys who will say that the static goes through the roof with pleated filters. I say your return is too small if your having that issue. Just because it's convenient to install a filter base, doesn't mean it's the right way to do it. Install some filter grilles. Open up that platform. Install another return on the ceiling if your numbers are unacceptable.

    Call me old-fashioned. But I do believe there is way too much hype about these "new" ways of filtering air. The filter was designed to protect the system. Not treat your customers' allergies. If it's that bad, tell your customer to buy a medical grade device. Quit selling them stuff they don't need. Sell them a maintenance contract and use quality filters, you'll be doing both parties a favor.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    East coast USA
    Posts
    925
    It seems like a never ending question

    check out the past in this old post. http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/archive/index.php/t-64483.html

    maybe, in 2012 they have figured out a better design. My supplier had a "super sale" on UV lights. I didn't buy. Still on the fence

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    13
    We use UV lights at work to kill off bloodborne pathogens. The purpose for home use is to disinfect airborne pathogens, which is good if you or someone in your household is sensitive to the cold or flu. In general, it's good to use it during flu season. This is from a pharmacist's perspective.

    However, this is where I think HEPA filtration will work better than UV. HEPA filtration will filter out all pathogens with 99.97% efficiency, even viruses, the smallest of all pathogens... bacteria and fungus (mold and mold spores).

    voc's is another story.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,552
    I'm bringing up this thread because the UV my mother has is mentioned. I stayed over night at her house, and will visit again on my return trip. She has a TopTech UV on the supply of her unit. I noticed the sheets that were stored in her linen closet were bleached at the fold marks. Could the UV be causing this?? BTW the Linen closet is away from the AC Unit closet. She has absolutely no mold in any ducts, and very little in the shower, also she does not use products with Chlorine in them.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by madhat View Post
    I'm bringing up this thread because the UV my mother has is mentioned. I stayed over night at her house, and will visit again on my return trip. She has a TopTech UV on the supply of her unit. I noticed the sheets that were stored in her linen closet were bleached at the fold marks. Could the UV be causing this?? BTW the Linen closet is away from the AC Unit closet. She has absolutely no mold in any ducts, and very little in the shower, also she does not use products with Chlorine in them.
    Not likely, as UV-C works only in line-of-sight and you indicated that the AHU is away from the linen closet...

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,552
    I was thinking on terms of the UV producing lower than it's rated 254 nanometers, and producing ozone.

  11. #50
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Lubbock Texas
    Posts
    769
    Quote Originally Posted by madhat View Post
    I was thinking on terms of the UV producing lower than it's rated 254 nanometers, and producing ozone.
    If you have a lamp that is producing a light wave below 254nm you would have ozone. Most of the lamps are in the 80% range on UVC the other 20% is above 254nm to produce the blue light so you can see the lamp is on in the UVA and UVB range. UV radiation is only line of site nothing escapes into the air stream. I have seen the bleaching of sheets before in a closet from long term storage, lint and high humidity. My bedroom closet is backed up to the laundry room and we get some heat off of the dryer that makes the walls condensate sometimes.
    The premise of ventilation is that the OA is clean or of sufficient quality to be used for dilution. Traditional ventilation is somewhat being threatened by the fact that the EPA is changing the requirements for outdoor air quality which is creating non-attainment zones in what is now becoming a significant portion of the country. That means that buildings in those areas will need to clean up the OA before they bring it into the building.
    www.genesisair.com
    Genesis Air Inc.

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by BPChiIL View Post
    Is there any value in adding one of these to a system? I have searched the internet and I can't seem to find a consensus. Need to turn to the pros.


    Thanks!

    BPChiIl

    At one time I was skeptical about the claims regarding UVC lights and health issues. As I understood the effects of UVC in HVAC systems the UV radiation would outright kill some biologicals or sufficiently damage the 'DNA' as to preclude reproduction.

    My first introduction to UVC lights was in 1996. I was asked by my supervisor if I could recommend a test site in one of our schools that was experiencing complaints of 'bad IAQ'.

    I immediately recalled a principal who mentioned headaches, scratchy throat, itchy eyes, etc; you know the script. It only happened when she returned to the school; no problems at home. She didn't make a stink about it; just put up with it.

    In August, when the office was vacant and no one was around to snoop, I installed 2 UVC fixtures with the bulbs approximately 4 inches from the downstream side of the center of the evaporator coil (this is a dual circuit 15 ton package rooftop heat pump and the evaporator coil is over 4 feet long and about 2 ½ tall, so it took 2 fixtures to cover the length of the coil). I wired the lights to remain on all the time.

    No one observed me working on the unit and I never revealed the existence of the lights.

    Around the middle of October, I offhandedly inquired of the principal about her headaches, etc.

    She said, “You know, I hadn't thought about it until you mentioned it, but I haven't had any problems since we came back.”

    I still never told anyone about the lights.

    This impressed me enough to install them in my home. I saw the advertisements showing how it cleaned the upstream side of the coil of biological film and kept the coil shiny by reflecting back and forth through the fins; I thought “yeah, right” but I wasn't really concerned with that as much as I was the IAQ benefits.

    I lined the inside of my air handler with heavy duty aluminum foil to keep the UV bouncing around (could also irradiate the blower wheel) and installed the light approximately 2 inches from the downstream side of the coil.

    After 2 weeks, I examined the upstream side of the coil and was surprised to find that it was indeed as shiny and clean as the ad photos claimed.

    Truth in advertising. Go figure.

    I've only installed one other light in a storage portable that had suffered a mold outbreak all over the walls, floors, ceiling tiles, shelves, files, supplies, etc. After remediation, the light was installed and has been in operation for about 6 years with annual replacement of the bulb (files and records are important enough to warrant this).

    I've seen that 2 year bulbs are available now.

    Empirical evidence at best, but I'm a believer.

  13. #52
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    south florida
    Posts
    76
    I have a question about U.V. Lights that I haven't seen asked or answered yet.
    Do they help at all with places that have excessive algae growth that clog the drain lines? If you reduce the microorganisms in the air, you reduce the amount in the condensation too, I assume. I know it won't do anything for algae already in the line. Does it reduce the amount produced around the coil and pan?

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