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Thread: Super Seal fix

  1. #1

    Question

    I have a Rheem heat pump (~15 yrs. old) that has had to have the refridgerant replaced 3 times in 2 years. So we obviously have a slow leak. The HVAC company that refilled it last time (in winter) said that once the weather warmed up they could look for the leak.

    Now that it's warmer I have contacted them to fix the problem. I have been given 2 options. 1. Test the system with dye to try to find the leak. 2. Assume the leak is in the line set and use Super Seal (the line set goes in between walls). Technically we have a third option of running a new line but this is a two story house and the inside part is in the attic and they said it would have to be on the outside of the house.

    Both options will be a couple hundred dollars. And if we use the dye and the leak is in the line then we have to go to the super seal anyway. They have told me that on their experience they assume the leak is in the line.

    The company is a friend of a friend so I'm sure everything is on the up and up. They have been very honest and upfront about the options. I just don't know what to do. Any advice?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    483
    Don't use the super seal. There are only 2 things that belong in any refrigeration or A/C system, and that is refrigerant and oil. Nothing else. Dye is ok to use if the leak cannot be located by other methods, most dye's are compatible with refrigerants and oils. If it were me and the leak was in the lineset then I would have a new linset put in. Hope this helps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold.calm
    Posts
    6,364
    Your system should have been isolated during the winter. Condensing unit/Line Set/Evaporator. 150#s Nitrogen. If this can still be done great, If not, Dye.
    3 times in 2 years you should have an oil stain some ware.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    So.Cal
    Posts
    452
    Adding the sealer = certain death. I bet that slow leak is in the evap not the line set, IMHO.

  5. #5
    hugodrax Guest
    Time to buy a 2006 model AC and dump the junker. I would not want to drive my car for 15 years.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Did they make any attempt to find the leak with an electronic leak detector?

    Most leaks end up being in the evaperator coil.

    If your contractor uses leak detection dyes and stop leak, find another contractor pronto!
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Originally posted by hugodrax
    I would not want to drive my car for 15 years.
    I'm the oposite, my newest car is 25 years old and is being restored. My regular driver is 31 years old. I hate new cars, give me something old and British, or old and German. Life is to short to drive boring cars. Even modern sports cars have no character or soul.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  8. #8
    Originally posted by mark beiser

    If your contractor uses leak detection dyes and stop leak, find another contractor pronto!
    that sounds like a commercial waiting to be produced!

  9. #9

    Smile Thanks

    Thank you to everyone who responded. I called another contractor for a second opinion. This time an electronic leak dector was used and no leak was detected! He ended up finding that some caps in the outside unit were loose!

    So thank goodness for second opinions and all your feedback that I should be leary of the Super Seal.

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